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indulge
used in The Brothers Karamazov

4 uses
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Definition
to give into a desire or enjoy something — especially in excess of what is thought good—such as a desire to eat too much cake, or be too lazy

or:

to allow or help someone to get their way or enjoy something — especially something that (probably because of excess) is not considered to be good or proper
  • I'm not drinking, I'm only 'indulging,' as that pig, your Rakitin, says.
    Book 3 — The Sensualists (17% in)
  • He'll be a civil councilor one day, but he'll always talk about 'indulging.'
    Book 3 — The Sensualists (18% in)
  • ...a smattering of education, who had been thrown off his balance by philosophical ideas above his level and certain modern theories of duty, which he learnt in practice from the reckless life of his master, who was also perhaps his father—Fyodor Pavlovitch; and, theoretically, from various strange philosophical conversations with his master's elder son, Ivan Fyodorovitch, who readily indulged in this diversion, probably feeling dull or wishing to amuse himself at the valet's expense.
    Book 12 — A Judicial Error (52% in)
  • Remember the sarcasms in which the prosecutor indulged at the expense of the respectful and 'pious' sentiments which suddenly came over the murderer.
    Book 12 — A Judicial Error (81% in)

There are no more uses of "indulge" in The Brothers Karamazov.

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