toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Go to Book

conscious
used in Atlas Shrugged

225 uses
(click/touch triangles for details)
1  —2 uses as in:
environmentally conscious
Definition
aware or concerned about something
  • Mr. Thompson sat motionless, with his face held self-consciously stiff.
    3.3 Part 3 Chapter 3 — Anti-Greed (15% in)
  • Her posture had the lightness and unself-conscious precision of an arrogantly pure self-confidence.
    2.6 Part 2 Chapter 6 — Miracle Metal (88% in)

There are no more uses of "conscious" flagged with this meaning in Atlas Shrugged.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
?  —223 uses
exact meaning not specified
  • "No ...." he said feebly once more, but it was no longer the voice of a living consciousness.
    3.9 Part 3 Chapter 9 — The Generator (97% in)
  • She kept her hands in the coat pockets, her posture taut, as if she resented immobility, and unfeminine, as if she were unconscious of her own body and that it was a woman's body.
    1.1 Part 1 Chapter 1 — The Theme (45% in)
  • They knocked in an even rhythm, every fourth knock accented, as if stressing a conscious purpose.
    1.1 Part 1 Chapter 1 — The Theme (47% in)
  • She was so used to them that she did not hear them consciously, but the sound became a sense of peace within her...... When she extinguished her cigarette, she knew that she needed another one, but thought that she would give herself a minute, just a few minutes, before she would light it...... She had fallen asleep and she awakened with a jolt, knowing that something was wrong, before she knew what it was: the wheels had stopped.
    1.1 Part 1 Chapter 1 — The Theme (54% in)
  • Her slender body, about to slump from exhaustion, was held erect by the straight line of the shoulders, and the shoulders were held by a conscious effort of will.
    1.1 Part 1 Chapter 1 — The Theme (85% in)
  • But every inch of its course, every pound of its pressure and the content of every molecule within it, were controlled and made by a conscious intention that had worked upon it for ten years.
    1.2 Part 1 Chapter 2 — The Chain (9% in)
  • It was a walk of some miles through empty country, but he had felt like doing it, without conscious reason.
    1.2 Part 1 Chapter 2 — The Chain (14% in)
  • The sight of the running metal was still burned into his mind, filling his consciousness, leaving no room for anything else.
    1.2 Part 1 Chapter 2 — The Chain (48% in)
  • His voice was cold, with a note of self-conscious virtue.
    1.2 Part 1 Chapter 2 — The Chain (96% in)
  • In unspoken understanding, as if bound by a vow it had never been necessary to take, she and Eddie Willers had given themselves to the railroad from the first conscious days of their childhood.
    1.3 Part 1 Chapter 3 — The Top and the Bottom (32% in)
  • It had been a struggle without the relief of violence, without the recognition of finding a conscious enemy, with only a deaf wall to batter, a wall of the most effective soundproofing: indifference, that swallowed blows, chords and screams-a battle of silence, for a man who could give to sounds a greater eloquence than they had ever carried-the silence of obscurity, of loneliness, of the nights when some rare orchestra played one of his works and he looked at the darkness, knowing...
    1.4 Part 1 Chapter 4 — The Immovable Movers (15% in)
  • Slowly, taking her time by conscious intention, she sat down and leaned back, looking at him.
    1.4 Part 1 Chapter 4 — The Immovable Movers (72% in)
  • There was no boasting in his manner and consciousness, no thought of comparison.
    1.5 Part 1 Chapter 5 — The Climax of the D'Anconias (13% in)
  • She braced her feet to stop the dizziness, she held her head straight and stood facing him in the consciousness of a new power, feeling herself his equal for the first time, looking at him with a mocking smile of triumph.
    1.5 Part 1 Chapter 5 — The Climax of the D'Anconias (32% in)
  • When he approached, she smiled innocently, as if unconscious of any contest intended or won.
    1.5 Part 1 Chapter 5 — The Climax of the D'Anconias (34% in)
  • She was conscious of nothing else.
    1.5 Part 1 Chapter 5 — The Climax of the D'Anconias (48% in)
  • But when a thin sheet of paper fluttered down to the floor and she bent to pick it up, she was suddenly as intently conscious of that particular moment, of herself and her own movement.
    1.5 Part 1 Chapter 5 — The Climax of the D'Anconias (48% in)
  • She had no conscious realization of his purpose, her vague knowledge of it was wiped out, she had no power to believe it clearly, in this moment, to believe it about herself, she knew only that she was afraid-yet what she felt was as if she were crying to him: Don't ask me for it-oh, don't ask me-do it!
    1.5 Part 1 Chapter 5 — The Climax of the D'Anconias (52% in)
  • She lay very still, conscious of nothing but a supreme need of caution.
    1.5 Part 1 Chapter 5 — The Climax of the D'Anconias (70% in)
  • She knew these were the words, even in the moments when there was nothing left within her but screaming and she wished she could lose the faculty of consciousness so that it would not tell her that what could not be true was true.
    1.5 Part 1 Chapter 5 — The Climax of the D'Anconias (74% in)
  • She said in the solemn, merciless tone of a prosecutor, "You did it consciously, cold-bloodedly and with full intention."
    1.5 Part 1 Chapter 5 — The Climax of the D'Anconias (81% in)
  • He was not conscious of it, he was looking off into some grim distance, but she felt certain that the action was a relief to him, perhaps as a contrast.
    1.5 Part 1 Chapter 5 — The Climax of the D'Anconias (92% in)
  • He had cried, "Good God!" leaping to his feet; he had hurried home, rushed up the stairs, started tearing his clothes off and gone through the routine of dressing, conscious only of the need to hurry, not of the purpose.
    1.6 Part 1 Chapter 6 — The Non-Commercial (1% in)
  • He did not speak, because his consciousness was held, not by coherent statements, but by two pictures that seemed to glare at him insistently.
    1.6 Part 1 Chapter 6 — The Non-Commercial (37% in)
  • Francisco shook his head slowly; the conscious deliberation of the movement gave it an air that was almost sadness.
    1.6 Part 1 Chapter 6 — The Non-Commercial (55% in)
  • She was not conscious of it.
    1.6 Part 1 Chapter 6 — The Non-Commercial (80% in)
  • He came to believe the doctrine that this desire was wholly physical, a desire, not of consciousness, but of matter, and he rebelled against the thought that his flesh could be free to choose and that its choice was impervious to the will of his mind.
    1.6 Part 1 Chapter 6 — The Non-Commercial (92% in)
  • It was not in the nature of his consciousness to understand the nature of the things he was hearing.
    1.7 Part 1 Chapter 7 — The Exploiters and the Exploited (83% in)
  • For the moment, with an unnatural clarity, with a brutal simplification that made it almost easy, his consciousness contained nothing but one thought: It must not stop me.
    1.7 Part 1 Chapter 7 — The Exploiters and the Exploited (94% in)
  • He sat that way for a few moments, conscious of nothing but pain, a screaming pain without content or limit-he sat, not knowing whether it was in his mind or his body, reduced to the terrible ugliness of pain that stopped thought.
    1.7 Part 1 Chapter 7 — The Exploiters and the Exploited (95% in)
  • To find a consciousness like her own, who would be the meaning of her world, as she would be of his ....
    1.8 Part 1 Chapter 8 — The John Galt Line (10% in)
  • He stood by the engine of the John Galt train, talking to somebody outside the field of her consciousness.
    1.8 Part 1 Chapter 8 — The John Galt Line (53% in)
  • She was dressed in blue slacks and shirt, she was unconscious of official duties, she had left them to him, the train was now her sole concern, as if she were only a member of its crew.
    1.8 Part 1 Chapter 8 — The John Galt Line (56% in)
  • Without conscious intention, people were beginning to stand still.
    1.8 Part 1 Chapter 8 — The John Galt Line (59% in)
  • She lay back, conscious of nothing but the pleasure it gave her.
    1.8 Part 1 Chapter 8 — The John Galt Line (66% in)
  • She found pleasure in the special self-consciousness it gave her.
    1.8 Part 1 Chapter 8 — The John Galt Line (74% in)
  • There were people by the bridge, the dark splash of a crowd, but they rolled off the edge of her consciousness.
    1.8 Part 1 Chapter 8 — The John Galt Line (84% in)
  • The shock became numbness spreading through her body-she felt a tight pressure in her throat and her stomach-she was conscious of nothing but a silent convulsion that made her unable to breathe.
    1.8 Part 1 Chapter 8 — The John Galt Line (96% in)
  • When he was left alone, Rearden felt a jolt of blinding anger, as it had come to him before, painful, single and sudden like an electric shock-the anger bursting out of the knowledge that one cannot deal with pure evil, with the naked, full-conscious evil that neither has nor seeks justification.
    1.10 Part 1 Chapter 10 — Wyatt's Torch (25% in)
  • Wiping out the rest, filling her consciousness, leaving no room for words, no time for wonder, as a glaring answer to the questions she had not begun to ask, stood two pictures: Ellis Wyatt's implacable figure in front of her desk, saying, "It is now in your power to destroy me; I may have to go; but if I go, I'll make sure that I take all the rest of you along with me"and the circling violence of Ellis Wyatt's body when he flung a glass to shatter against the wall.
    1.10 Part 1 Chapter 10 — Wyatt's Torch (96% in)
  • The only consciousness the pictures left her was the feeling of the approach of some unthinkable disaster, and the feeling that she had to outrun it.
    1.10 Part 1 Chapter 10 — Wyatt's Torch (96% in)
  • When Ferris had gone, Dr. Stadler sat at his desk, his shoulders shrinking together, conscious only of a desperate wish not to be seen by anyone.
    2.1 Part 2 Chapter 1 — The Man Who Belonged on Earth (24% in)
  • Her eyes were half-closed in the mocking, conscious triumph of being admired, but her mouth was half-open in helpless, begging expectation.
    2.1 Part 2 Chapter 1 — The Man Who Belonged on Earth (73% in)
  • He stood across the room, looking at her, at her flat stomach drawn in, as her breath was drawn, at the sensitive body of a sensitive consciousness.
    2.1 Part 2 Chapter 1 — The Man Who Belonged on Earth (73% in)
  • They sat in a manner of self-conscious display, as if the enormous cost of their clothes and the enormous care of their grooming should have fused into splendor, but didn't.
    2.1 Part 2 Chapter 1 — The Man Who Belonged on Earth (82% in)
  • He held the length of her body pressed to his, as if their bodies were two currents rising upward together, each to a single point, each carrying the whole of their consciousness to the meeting of their lips.
    2.1 Part 2 Chapter 1 — The Man Who Belonged on Earth (99% in)
  • It was like the jolt of returning to consciousness: two words suddenly made everything real to her.
    2.2 Part 2 Chapter 2 — The Aristocracy of Pull (32% in)
  • He walked briskly, in a Morse code pattern of short dashes and brief stops, with a manner of faint irritation, as if conscious of the number of people whom his displeasure might worry.
    2.2 Part 2 Chapter 2 — The Aristocracy of Pull (34% in)
  • The image still holding his consciousness was the moment when he had entered this room with Lillian and had seen Dagny looking at them.
    2.2 Part 2 Chapter 2 — The Aristocracy of Pull (41% in)
  • Rearden did not know how long that moment lasted or what he had felt, it had been like a blow hurling him into another kind of consciousness, then a second blow returning him to his own-all that was left, as at the awakening from a narcotic, was the feeling that he had known some immense kind of freedom, never to be matched in reality.
    2.2 Part 2 Chapter 2 — The Aristocracy of Pull (93% in)
  • He heard the sentence, but it had to wait its turn to enter the crowded passages to his consciousness.
    2.3 Part 2 Chapter 3 — White Blackmail (0% in)
  • But as his living room remained on the edge of his vision, so the sense of some action he had to perform remained on the edge of his consciousness.
    2.3 Part 2 Chapter 3 — White Blackmail (2% in)
  • They hit his consciousness together: the breakfast table-the door to his bedroom.
    2.3 Part 2 Chapter 3 — White Blackmail (14% in)
  • What he told himself consciously was: Be careful.
    2.3 Part 2 Chapter 3 — White Blackmail (71% in)
  • The clatter of the metal came in a flow of irregular sounds without discernible rhythm, not like the action of a mechanism, but as if some conscious impulse were behind every sudden, tearing rise that went up and crashed, scattering into the faint moan of gears.
    2.3 Part 2 Chapter 3 — White Blackmail (86% in)
  • Rearden thought that he leaped for the door the instant the scream hit his consciousness, but he saw that he was an instant late, because Francisco had preceded him.
    2.3 Part 2 Chapter 3 — White Blackmail (87% in)
  • The furnace foreman lay knocked unconscious, the white flow spurted, slowly tearing the hole wider, and men were struggling with sand, hose and fire clay to stop the glowing streaks that spread in a heavy, gliding motion, eating everything on their way into jets of acrid smoke.
    2.3 Part 2 Chapter 3 — White Blackmail (88% in)
  • Rearden's consciousness became a progression of bending, raising the weight, aiming and sending it down and, before it had reached its unseen destination, bending for the next one again, a consciousness drawn tight upon watching the aim of his arm, to save the furnace, and the precarious posture of his feet, to save himself.
    2.3 Part 2 Chapter 3 — White Blackmail (90% in)
  • Rearden's consciousness became a progression of bending, raising the weight, aiming and sending it down and, before it had reached its unseen destination, bending for the next one again, a consciousness drawn tight upon watching the aim of his arm, to save the furnace, and the precarious posture of his feet, to save himself.
    2.3 Part 2 Chapter 3 — White Blackmail (91% in)
  • Somewhere on the outer edge of Rearden's consciousness, there was the thought that accidents of this nature were happening more frequently now, caused by the kind of ore he was using, but he had to use whatever ore he could find.
    2.3 Part 2 Chapter 3 — White Blackmail (95% in)
  • -was it a conscious policy, devised with full awareness of its meaning?
    2.4 Part 2 Chapter 4 — The Sanction of the Victim (13% in)
  • The swiftness with which their eyes moved to her was an involuntary answer to an unexpected sound, but the swiftness with which they moved away-to look down at the table, at the walls, anywhere but at her-was the conscious answer to the meaning of the sounds.
    2.5 Part 2 Chapter 5 — Account Overdrawn (27% in)
  • But a small man who sat unobtrusively in the best armchair of the room, apart from the others, content to be ignored and fully aware that none of them could be unconscious of his presence, glanced at Lawson, then at Mouch, and said with brisk cheerfulness, "That's the line, Wesley.
    2.6 Part 2 Chapter 6 — Miracle Metal (1% in)
  • He felt that his one danger would be to glance directly at Danneskjold-and he kept his eyes on the policeman, on the brass buttons of a blue uniform, but the object filling his consciousness, more forcefully than a visual perception, was Danneskjold's body, the naked body under the clothes, the body that would be wiped out of existence.
    2.7 Part 2 Chapter 7 — The Moratorium on Brains (41% in)
  • The work gave her the calm she needed; she had not noticed how she began it or why; she had started without conscious intention, but she saw it growing under her hands, pulling her forward, giving her a healing sense of peace.
    2.8 Part 2 Chapter 8 — By Our Love (4% in)
  • Fighting not to know them, not to feel them, her body rigid but for the grinding motion of her face against her arm, she would draw whatever power over her consciousness still remained to her into the soundless, toneless repetition of the words: Get it over with, There were long stretches of calm, when she was able to face her problem with the dispassionate clarity of weighing a problem in engineering.
    2.8 Part 2 Chapter 8 — By Our Love (14% in)
  • She barely listened, she was conscious only of the flow of chords that seemed to play an underscoring harmony for the flow of the smoke curving slowly from her cigarette, for the curving motion of her arm moving the cigarette to her lips once in a while.
    2.8 Part 2 Chapter 8 — By Our Love (20% in)
  • The first thing to reach her consciousness was the sudden jerk of her own hand flinging the cigarette aside.
    2.8 Part 2 Chapter 8 — By Our Love (21% in)
  • She backed away from him; she felt as if emotion had flung her ahead of her own consciousness, and questions were now catching up with her, groping toward the form of words.
    2.8 Part 2 Chapter 8 — By Our Love (28% in)
  • I am destroying d'Anconia Copper, consciously, deliberately, by plan and by my own hand.
    2.8 Part 2 Chapter 8 — By Our Love (37% in)
  • The details of the story were obtained from Luke Beal, fireman of the Taggart luxury main liner, the Comet, who was found unconscious at the western portal of the tunnel this morning, and who appears to be the sole survivor of the catastrophe.
    2.8 Part 2 Chapter 8 — By Our Love (54% in)
  • The clogged ball of emotion was like a physical weight in his chest, filling his consciousness, releasing him from the responsibility of thought.
    2.8 Part 2 Chapter 8 — By Our Love (68% in)
  • She remained standing before him, as if consciously letting him see that she had nothing to hide, not even the weariness of her posture, the price she had paid for this day and her carelessness of price.
    2.9 Part 2 Chapter 9 — The Face Without Pain or Fear or Guilt (8% in)
  • The sound she made was half-chuckle, half-moan-it was not a desire for vengeance, but a desperate sense of justice that drove the cutting bitterness of her voice, as she cried, consciously throwing the words at his face, "You wanted to know the name of that other man?
    2.9 Part 2 Chapter 9 — The Face Without Pain or Fear or Guilt (43% in)
  • There was no sign of pain to give her any warning; he looked as if he were just a man who stood still in the middle of a room, making his consciousness absorb a fact that it refused to absorb.
    2.9 Part 2 Chapter 9 — The Face Without Pain or Fear or Guilt (45% in)
  • He seized her shoulders, and she felt prepared to accept that he would now kill her or beat her into unconsciousness, and in the moment when she felt certain that he had thought of it, she felt her body thrown against him and his mouth falling on hers, more brutally than the act of a beating would have permitted.
    2.9 Part 2 Chapter 9 — The Face Without Pain or Fear or Guilt (47% in)
  • There were few people on the platform around him and they seemed to move with self-conscious strain, as if a sense of disaster clung to the rails and to the girders above their heads.
    2.9 Part 2 Chapter 9 — The Face Without Pain or Fear or Guilt (86% in)
  • He was looking at the conductor, his eyes observant, fully conscious, but devoid of any reaction.
    2.10 Part 2 Chapter 10 — The Sign of the Dollar (5% in)
  • She saw nothing in his face except the blind malevolence of pain, of some long-repressed anger that broke out upon the first object available, almost without consciousness of the object's identity.
    2.10 Part 2 Chapter 10 — The Sign of the Dollar (6% in)
  • He got so you never saw him fully conscious any more.
    2.10 Part 2 Chapter 10 — The Sign of the Dollar (23% in)
  • I'd like to think that I am wrong, that those words mean nothing, that there's no conscious intention and no avenger behind the ending of the human race.
    2.10 Part 2 Chapter 10 — The Sign of the Dollar (44% in)
  • She was struck by a quality of anger in their silencean anger saying that she was supposed to spare them moments such as this-and, with a feeling of cruelty new to her, she remained silent by conscious intention.
    2.10 Part 2 Chapter 10 — The Sign of the Dollar (55% in)
  • She had not had time to be aware of him, except as of a providential comrade-in-competence; now she glanced at him with conscious attention.
    2.10 Part 2 Chapter 10 — The Sign of the Dollar (61% in)
  • She whirled to him, realizing what decision her mind had been reaching without her conscious knowledge.
    2.10 Part 2 Chapter 10 — The Sign of the Dollar (79% in)
  • Then she climbed aboard-and the next span of her consciousness was not separate moments and movements, but the sweep of a single motion and a single unit of time, a progression forming one entity, like the notes of a piece of music: from the touch of her hand on the starter-to the blast of the motor's sound that broke off, like a mountain rockslide, all contact with the time behind her-to the circling fall of a blade that vanished in a fragile sparkle of whirling air that cut the space...
    2.10 Part 2 Chapter 10 — The Sign of the Dollar (83% in)
  • She noticed that the distance to the stranger's plane had shrunk: he had checked his speed for the dangerous crossing, while she had gone on, unconscious of the danger, with only the muscles of her arms and legs fighting to keep her plane aloft.
    2.10 Part 2 Chapter 10 — The Sign of the Dollar (93% in)
  • It seemed to her for a moment that she was in the presence of a being who was pure consciousness-yet she had never been so aware of a man's body.
    3.1 Part 3 Chapter 1 — Atlantis (1% in)
  • And then, her consciousness returning fully, she realized that this man was a total stranger.
    3.1 Part 3 Chapter 1 — Atlantis (2% in)
  • She felt as if she were returning to consciousness after a crash that had shattered more than an airplane.
    3.1 Part 3 Chapter 1 — Atlantis (3% in)
  • She stood looking up at the structure, her consciousness surrendered to a single sight and a single, wordless emotion-but she had always known that an emotion was a sum totaled by an adding machine of the mind, and what she now felt was the instantaneous total of the thoughts she did not have to name, the final sum of a long progression, like a voice telling her by means of a feeling: If she had held onto Ouentin Daniels, with no hope of a chance to use the motor, for the sole sake of...
    3.1 Part 3 Chapter 1 — Atlantis (55% in)
  • She felt a sudden pressure at the base of her throat, her head leaned back a little, no more than to feel the faint shift of a current against her hair, but it was as if she were lying back in space, against the wind, conscious of nothing but his legs and the shape of his mouth.
    3.1 Part 3 Chapter 1 — Atlantis (58% in)
  • While the strength of her body was gone, while her mind had lost the faculty of consciousness, a single emotion drew on her remnants of energy, of understanding, of judgment, of control, leaving her nothing to resist it with or to direct it, making her unable to desire, only to feel, reducing her to a mere sensation-a static sensation without start or goal.
    3.1 Part 3 Chapter 1 — Atlantis (62% in)
  • "Through all the ages," he said, "the mind has been regarded as evil, and every form of insult: from heretic to materialist to exploiterevery form of iniquity: from exile to disfranchisement to expropriation-every form of torture: from sneers to rack to firing squadhave been brought down upon those who assumed the responsibility of looking at the world through the eyes of a living consciousness and performing the crucial act of a rational connection.
    3.1 Part 3 Chapter 1 — Atlantis (72% in)
  • It was always the animal's attributes, not man's, that humanity worshipped: the idol of instinct and the idol of force-the mystics and the kings-the mystics, who longed for an irresponsible consciousness and ruled by means of the claim that their dark emotions were superior to reason, that knowledge came in blind, causeless fits, blindly to be followed, not doubted-and the kings, who ruled by means of claws and muscles, with conquest as their method and looting as their aim, with a...
    3.1 Part 3 Chapter 1 — Atlantis (74% in)
  • We were scattered all over the country, as the outcasts we had always been, only now we accepted our parts with conscious intention.
    3.1 Part 3 Chapter 1 — Atlantis (91% in)
  • Part of it was an emotion she had never experienced before: an awed respect that made her hesitantly conscious of her hands, as if to touch any object around her would be too great an intimacy.
    3.2 Part 3 Chapter 2 — The Utopia of Greed (1% in)
  • He was watching her, openly and with an untroubled look, as if her presence were normal-and as if the sight of her were all he wished to allow into his consciousness.
    3.2 Part 3 Chapter 2 — The Utopia of Greed (17% in)
  • She became suddenly conscious of her posture: she had let her shoulder blades slide down against the chair, carelessly, half-lying, one leg stretched forward-and with her sternly tailored, transparent blouse, her wide peasant skirt hand-printed in violent colors, her thin stocking and high-heeled pump, she did not look like a railroad executive-the consciousness of it struck her in answer to his eyes that seemed to be seeing the unattainable-she looked like that which she was: his...
    3.2 Part 3 Chapter 2 — The Utopia of Greed (39% in)
  • ...suddenly conscious of her posture: she had let her shoulder blades slide down against the chair, carelessly, half-lying, one leg stretched forward-and with her sternly tailored, transparent blouse, her wide peasant skirt hand-printed in violent colors, her thin stocking and high-heeled pump, she did not look like a railroad executive-the consciousness of it struck her in answer to his eyes that seemed to be seeing the unattainable-she looked like that which she was: his servant girl.
    3.2 Part 3 Chapter 2 — The Utopia of Greed (39% in)
  • No. He's my conscious enemy.
    3.2 Part 3 Chapter 2 — The Utopia of Greed (41% in)
  • -I mean your understanding and the fact that your enjoyment was of the same nature as mine, that it came from the same source: from your intelligence, from the conscious judgment of a mind able to judge my work by the standard of the same values that went to write it-I mean, not the fact that you felt, but that you felt what I wished you to feel, not the fact that you admire my work, but that you admire it for the things I wished to be admired.
    3.2 Part 3 Chapter 2 — The Utopia of Greed (47% in)
  • She was speaking with a swift, bright certainty, conscious of nothing but the joy of performing her natural function in her natural world where nothing could take precedence over the act of offering a solution to a problem.
    3.2 Part 3 Chapter 2 — The Utopia of Greed (66% in)
  • Nobody stays in this valley except by a full, conscious choice based on a full, conscious knowledge of every fact involved in his decision.
    3.2 Part 3 Chapter 2 — The Utopia of Greed (68% in)
  • Nobody stays in this valley except by a full, conscious choice based on a full, conscious knowledge of every fact involved in his decision.
    3.2 Part 3 Chapter 2 — The Utopia of Greed (68% in)
  • She was conscious of the long span of moments she took while turning her head to Galt.
    3.2 Part 3 Chapter 2 — The Utopia of Greed (69% in)
  • His wife-she thought, letting herself hear consciously the word Dr. Akston had not pronounced, the word she had long since felt, but never named-for three weeks she had been his wife in every sense but one, and that final one was still to be earned, but this much was real and today she could permit herself to know it, to feel it, to live with that one thought for this one day.
    3.2 Part 3 Chapter 2 — The Utopia of Greed (75% in)
  • The groceries, which Lawrence Hammond was lining up at her order on the polished counter of his store, had never appeared to her as such shining objects-and, intent upon them, she was only half-conscious of some disturbing element, of something that was wrong but that her mind was too full to notice.
    3.2 Part 3 Chapter 2 — The Utopia of Greed (76% in)
  • I was badly injured and remained unconscious for most of two weeks.
    3.3 Part 3 Chapter 3 — Anti-Greed (49% in)
  • In some terms different from hers, in some inconceivable manner of consciousness, they knew all that she could tell them, it was useless to prove to them the irrational horror of their course and of its consequences, both Meigs and Taggart knew itand the secret of their consciousness was the means by which they escaped the finality of their knowledge, "I see," she said quietly.
    3.3 Part 3 Chapter 3 — Anti-Greed (55% in)
  • In some terms different from hers, in some inconceivable manner of consciousness, they knew all that she could tell them, it was useless to prove to them the irrational horror of their course and of its consequences, both Meigs and Taggart knew itand the secret of their consciousness was the means by which they escaped the finality of their knowledge, "I see," she said quietly.
    3.3 Part 3 Chapter 3 — Anti-Greed (56% in)
  • It was not within the power of Dagny's consciousness ever to understand that plea or to know what response Lillian had hoped to find; she knew only that she had not found it, when she heard the sudden shrillness of Lillian's voice: "Have you understood me?"
    3.3 Part 3 Chapter 3 — Anti-Greed (70% in)
  • Her eyes seemed abnormally alive in a face drained of color, as if her consciousness remained untouched in a body broken by exhaustion.
    3.3 Part 3 Chapter 3 — Anti-Greed (98% in)
  • Her last awareness, before she surrendered the responsibility of consciousness, was the sense of an enormous void, the void of a city and of a continent where she would never be able to find the man whom she had no right to seek.
    3.3 Part 3 Chapter 3 — Anti-Greed (**% in)
  • There had been mornings when, awakening with rays of sunlight on her face, she had thought that she must hurry to Hammond's Market to get fresh eggs for breakfast; then, recapturing full consciousness, seeing the haze of New York beyond the window of her bedroom, she had felt a tearing stab, like a touch of death, the touch of rejecting reality.
    3.4 Part 3 Chapter 4 — Anti-Life (51% in)
  • -the only conscious part of his rage seemed to be screaming to him-he was, at last, himself!
    3.4 Part 3 Chapter 4 — Anti-Life (82% in)
  • ...dog she had heard about, she thought .... somebody's dog in somebody's laboratory .... the dog who got his signals switched on him, and saw no way to tell satisfaction from torture, saw food changed to beatings and beatings to food, saw his eyes and ears deceiving him and his judgment futile and his consciousness impotent in a shifting, swimming, shapeless world-and gave up, refusing to eat at that price or to live in a world of that kind...... No! was the only conscious word in her brain-no!
    3.4 Part 3 Chapter 4 — Anti-Life (98% in)
  • ...dog she had heard about, she thought .... somebody's dog in somebody's laboratory .... the dog who got his signals switched on him, and saw no way to tell satisfaction from torture, saw food changed to beatings and beatings to food, saw his eyes and ears deceiving him and his judgment futile and his consciousness impotent in a shifting, swimming, shapeless world-and gave up, refusing to eat at that price or to live in a world of that kind...... No! was the only conscious word in her brain-no!
    3.4 Part 3 Chapter 4 — Anti-Life (98% in)
  • Then she ran, ran by the sudden propulsion of a burst of power, the power of a creature running for its life, she ran straight down the street that ended at the river-and in a single streak of speed, with no break, no moment of doubt, with full consciousness of acting in self-preservation, she kept running till the parapet barred her way and, not stopping, went over into space.
    3.4 Part 3 Chapter 4 — Anti-Life (**% in)
  • There was the form of the formless, she thought, there was the method of his consciousness: he wanted her to protect him from Cuffy Meigs without acknowledging Meigs' existence, to fight it without admitting its reality, to defeat it without disturbing its game.
    3.5 Part 3 Chapter 5 — Their Brothers' Keepers (12% in)
  • Philip's moment of grasping a sudden revelation was not accomplished by means of thought, but by means of that dark sensation which was his only mode of consciousness: he felt a sensation of terror, squeezing his throat, shivering down into his stomach-he was seeing the spread of the mills, with the roving streamers of flame, with the ladles of molten metal sailing through space on delicate cables, with open pits the color of glowing coal, with cranes coming at his head, pounding past,...
    3.5 Part 3 Chapter 5 — Their Brothers' Keepers (42% in)
  • She wore a single piece of jewelry, a diamond clip at the edge of the black neckline, that kept flashing with the imperceptible motion of her breath, like a transformer converting a flicker into fire, making one conscious, not of the gems, but of the living beat behind them; it flashed like a military decoration, like wealth worn as a badge of honor.
    3.5 Part 3 Chapter 5 — Their Brothers' Keepers (68% in)
  • She noticed some faces in the crowd staring at her with a peculiar look: with a veiled resentment and the kind of insolent curiosity that made her suddenly conscious of being a woman.
    3.5 Part 3 Chapter 5 — Their Brothers' Keepers (83% in)
  • It was the soft voice of the tower director, who stood by her side, with some sort of paper in his hand-and she thought it was strange to emerge from a span of unconsciousness which had been the span of the sharpest awareness she had ever experienced, only she did not know how long it had lasted or where she was or why.
    3.5 Part 3 Chapter 5 — Their Brothers' Keepers (84% in)
  • She was seeing those moments aboard a train when, at its plunge into the tunnels, she had felt a sudden, solemn tension, as if this place were showing her in naked simplicity the essence of her railroad and of her life, the union of consciousness and matter, the frozen form of a mind's ingenuity giving physical existence to its purpose; she had felt a sense of sudden hope, as if this place held the meaning of all of her values, and a sense of secret excitement, as if a nameless promise...
    3.5 Part 3 Chapter 5 — Their Brothers' Keepers (85% in)
  • ...to its rightful owners .... you had a look of energy and of its reward, together .... and I was the first man who had ever stated in what manner these two were inseparable...... The next span of moments was like flashes of light in stretches of blinded unconsciousness-the moment when she saw his face, as he stopped beside her, when she saw the unastonished calm, the leashed intensity, the laughter of understanding in the dark green eyes-the moment when she knew what he saw in her face, by the...
    3.5 Part 3 Chapter 5 — Their Brothers' Keepers (88% in)
  • Then she was conscious of nothing but the sensations of her body, because her body acquired the sudden power to let her know her most complex values by direct perception.
    3.5 Part 3 Chapter 5 — Their Brothers' Keepers (89% in)
  • He pulled her head back for a moment, to look straight into her eyes, to let her see his, to let her know the full meaning of their actions, as if throwing the spotlight of consciousness upon them for the meeting of their eyes in a moment of intimacy greater than the one to come.
    3.5 Part 3 Chapter 5 — Their Brothers' Keepers (90% in)
  • You know that you've broken me for once, that I broke the decision I had set for myself-but I did it consciously, knowing what it meant, I did it, not in blind surrender to the moment, but with full sight of the consequences and full willingness to bear them.
    3.5 Part 3 Chapter 5 — Their Brothers' Keepers (97% in)
  • For a moment, while his consciousness had a purity to equal the sky's, while he was aware of nothing but himself and had not yet reharnessed his soul to the burden of alien memories, he lay still, held by the sight and by the enchantment of a world to match it, a world where the style of existence would be a continuous morning.
    3.6 Part 3 Chapter 6 — The Concerto of Deliverance (12% in)
  • ...did not know-and their panic was the last of their struggle to escape the knowledge-that his merciless sense of justice, which had been their only hold on him, which had made him take any punishment and give them the benefit of every doubt, was now turned against them-that the same force that had made him tolerant, was now the force that made him ruthless-that the justice which would forgive miles of innocent errors of knowledge, would not forgive a single step taken in conscious evil.
    3.6 Part 3 Chapter 6 — The Concerto of Deliverance (25% in)
  • He saw, on their faces, that stubbornly evasive look which he had once thought to be the look of a liar cheating a victim, but which he now knew to be worse: the look of a man cheating himself of his own consciousness.
    3.6 Part 3 Chapter 6 — The Concerto of Deliverance (48% in)
  • -he thought; he thought it almost without feeling, without right to feel, conscious of nothing but a solemnly reverent clarity.
    3.6 Part 3 Chapter 6 — The Concerto of Deliverance (56% in)
  • From the first catch-phrases flung at a child to the last, it is like a series of shocks to freeze his motor, to undercut the power of his consciousness.
    3.6 Part 3 Chapter 6 — The Concerto of Deliverance (87% in)
  • It seemed to Rearden that his consciousness shot forward ahead of his body, it was his body that refused to move, stunned by shock, while his mind was laughing, telling him that this was the most natural, the most-to-have-been-expected event in the world.
    3.6 Part 3 Chapter 6 — The Concerto of Deliverance (97% in)
  • -the other was like a prayer of dedication: There's still a chance to win, but let me be the only victim...... It was strange-she thought, in the days that followed, looking at the men around her-that catastrophe had made them aware of Hank Rearden with an intensity that his achievements had not aroused, as if the paths of their consciousness were open to disaster, but not to value.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (2% in)
  • Every morning, for a month, on entering her office, she had been conscious, not of the room around her, but of the tunnels below, under the floors of the building-and she had worked, feeling as if some marginal part of her brain was computing figures, reading reports, making decisions in a rush of lifeless activity, while her living mind was inactive and still, frozen in contemplation, forbidden to move beyond the sentence: He's down there.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (4% in)
  • The key to what you so recklessly call 'human nature,' the open secret you live with, yet dread to name, is the fact that man is a being of volitional consciousness.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (16% in)
  • A being of volitional consciousness has no automatic course of behavior.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (17% in)
  • Happiness is that state of consciousness which proceeds from the achievement of one's values.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (19% in)
  • Existence exists-and the act of grasping that statement implies two corollary axioms: that something exists which one perceives and that one exists possessing consciousness, consciousness being the faculty of perceiving that which exists.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (21% in)
  • Existence exists-and the act of grasping that statement implies two corollary axioms: that something exists which one perceives and that one exists possessing consciousness, consciousness being the faculty of perceiving that which exists.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (21% in)
  • If nothing exists, there can be no consciousness: a consciousness with nothing to be conscious of is a contradiction in terms.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (21% in)
  • If nothing exists, there can be no consciousness: a consciousness with nothing to be conscious of is a contradiction in terms.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (21% in)
  • If nothing exists, there can be no consciousness: a consciousness with nothing to be conscious of is a contradiction in terms.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (21% in)
  • A consciousness conscious of nothing but itself is a contradiction in terms: before it could identify itself as consciousness, it had to be conscious of something.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (21% in)
  • A consciousness conscious of nothing but itself is a contradiction in terms: before it could identify itself as consciousness, it had to be conscious of something.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (21% in)
  • A consciousness conscious of nothing but itself is a contradiction in terms: before it could identify itself as consciousness, it had to be conscious of something.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (21% in)
  • A consciousness conscious of nothing but itself is a contradiction in terms: before it could identify itself as consciousness, it had to be conscious of something.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (21% in)
  • If that which you claim to perceive does not exist, what you possess is not consciousness.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (21% in)
  • Whatever the degree of your knowledge, these two-existence and consciousness-are axioms you cannot escape, these two are the irreducible primaries implied in any action you undertake, in any part of your knowledge and in its sum, from the first ray of light you perceive at the start of your life to the widest erudition you might acquire at its end.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (21% in)
  • I am here to complete it: Existence is Identity, Consciousness is Identification.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (22% in)
  • Reality is that which exists; the unreal does not exist; the unreal is merely that negation of existence which is the content of a human consciousness when it attempts to abandon reason.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (23% in)
  • That which you call your soul or spirit is your consciousness, and that which you call 'free will' is your mind's freedom to think or not, the only will you have, your only freedom, the choice that controls all the choices you make and determines your life and your character.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (24% in)
  • And his basic vice, the source of all his evils, is that nameless act which all of you practice, but struggle never to admit: the act of blanking out, the willful suspension of one's consciousness, the refusal to think-not blindness, but the refusal to see; not ignorance, but the refusal to know.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (24% in)
  • These three values imply and require all of man's virtues, and all his virtues pertain to the relation of existence and consciousness: rationality, independence, integrity, honesty, justice, productiveness, pride.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (25% in)
  • ...precedence over that act of perceiving it, which is thinking-that the mind is one's only judge of values and one's only guide of action-that reason is an absolute that permits no compromise-that a concession to the irrational invalidates one's consciousness and turns it from the task of perceiving to the task of faking reality-that the alleged short-cut to knowledge, which is faith, is only a short-circuit destroying the mind-that the acceptance of a mystical invention is a wish for...
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (26% in)
  • ...is one's only judge of values and one's only guide of action-that reason is an absolute that permits no compromise-that a concession to the irrational invalidates one's consciousness and turns it from the task of perceiving to the task of faking reality-that the alleged short-cut to knowledge, which is faith, is only a short-circuit destroying the mind-that the acceptance of a mystical invention is a wish for the annihilation of existence and, properly, annihilates one's consciousness.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (26% in)
  • ...is the recognition of the fact that yours is the responsibility of judgment and nothing can help you escape it-that no substitute can do your thinking, as no pinch-hitter can live your lifethat the vilest form of self-abasement and self-destruction is the subordination of your mind to the mind of another, the acceptance of an authority over your brain, the acceptance of his assertions as facts, his say-so as truth, his edicts as middle-man between your consciousness and your existence.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (26% in)
  • Integrity is the recognition of the fact that you cannot fake your consciousness, just as honesty is the recognition of the fact that you cannot fake existence-that man is an indivisible entity, an integrated unit of two attributes: of matter and consciousness, and that he may permit no breach between body and mind, between action and thought, between his life and his convictions-that, like a judge impervious to public opinion, he may not sacrifice his convictions to the wishes of...
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (26% in)
  • ...is the recognition of the fact that you cannot fake your consciousness, just as honesty is the recognition of the fact that you cannot fake existence-that man is an indivisible entity, an integrated unit of two attributes: of matter and consciousness, and that he may permit no breach between body and mind, between action and thought, between his life and his convictions-that, like a judge impervious to public opinion, he may not sacrifice his convictions to the wishes of others, be...
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (26% in)
  • ...between body and mind, between action and thought, between his life and his convictions-that, like a judge impervious to public opinion, he may not sacrifice his convictions to the wishes of others, be it the whole of mankind shouting pleas or threats against him-that courage and confidence are practical necessities, that courage is the practical form of being true to existence, of being true to truth, and confidence is the practical form of being true to one's own consciousness.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (26% in)
  • ...their rationality, their perceptiveness become the enemies you have to dread and flee-that you do not care to live as a dependent, least of all a dependent on the stupidity of others, or as a fool whose source of values is the fools he succeeds in fooling-that honesty is not a social duty, not a sacrifice for the sake of others, but the most profoundly selfish virtue man can practice: his refusal to sacrifice the reality of his own existence to the deluded consciousness of others.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (27% in)
  • ...higher than justice is to devaluate your moral currency and defraud the good in favor of the evil, since only the good can lose by a default of justice and only the evil can profit-and that the bottom of the pit at the end of that road, the act of moral bankruptcy, is to punish men for their virtues and reward them for their vices, that that is the collapse to full depravity, the Black Mass of the worship of death, the dedication of your consciousness to the destruction of existence.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (27% in)
  • Productiveness is your acceptance of morality, your recognition of the fact that you choose to live-that productive work is the process by which man's consciousness controls his existence, a constant process of acquiring knowledge and shaping matter to fit one's purpose, of translating an idea into physical form, of remaking the earth in the image of one's values-that all work is creative work ft done by a thinking mind, and no work is creative if done by a blank who repeats in...
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (28% in)
  • ...matter and spirit, a soul that seeks above all else to achieve its own moral perfection, valuing nothing higher than itself-and that the proof of an achieved self-esteem is your soul's shudder of contempt and rebellion against the role of a sacrificial animal, against the vile impertinence of any creed that proposes to immolate the irreplaceable value which is your consciousness and the incomparable glory which is your existence to the blind evasions and the stagnant decay of others.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (29% in)
  • Just as your body has two fundamental sensations, pleasure and pain, as signs of its welfare or injury, as a barometer of its basic alternative, life or death, so your consciousness has two fundamental emotions, joy and suffering, in answer to the same alternative.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (30% in)
  • They have taught him that his body and his consciousness are two enemies engaged in deadly conflict, two antagonists of opposite natures, contradictory claims, incompatible needs, that to benefit one is to injure the other, that his soul belongs to a supernatural realm, but his body is an evil prison holding it in bondage to this earth-and that the good is to defeat his body, to undermine it by years of patient struggle, digging his way to that glorious jail-break which leads into the...
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (37% in)
  • Real existence, they tell him, is that which he cannot perceive, true consciousness is the faculty of perceiving the non-existent-and if he is unable to understand it, that is the proof that his existence is evil and his. consciousness impotent.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (38% in)
  • Real existence, they tell him, is that which he cannot perceive, true consciousness is the faculty of perceiving the non-existent-and if he is unable to understand it, that is the proof that his existence is evil and his. consciousness impotent.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (38% in)
  • As products of the split between man's soul and body, there are two kinds of teachers of the Morality of Death: the mystics of spirit and the mystics of muscle, whom you call the spiritualists and the materialists, those who believe in consciousness without existence and those who believe in existence without consciousness.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (38% in)
  • As products of the split between man's soul and body, there are two kinds of teachers of the Morality of Death: the mystics of spirit and the mystics of muscle, whom you call the spiritualists and the materialists, those who believe in consciousness without existence and those who believe in existence without consciousness.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (38% in)
  • The good, say the mystics of spirit, is God, a being whose only definition is that he is beyond man's power to conceive-a definition that invalidates man's consciousness and nullifies his concepts of existence.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (38% in)
  • You are an indivisible entity of matter and consciousness.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (42% in)
  • Renounce your consciousness and you become a brute.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (42% in)
  • They tell you that they possess a means of knowledge higher than the mind, a mode of consciousness superior to reason-like a special pull with some bureaucrat of the universe who gives them secret tips withheld from others.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (49% in)
  • Both kinds demand that you invalidate your own consciousness and surrender yourself into their power.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (49% in)
  • Your teachers, the mystics of both schools, have reversed causality in their consciousness, then strive to reverse it in existence.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (52% in)
  • They want to cheat the axiom of existence and consciousness, they want their consciousness to be an instrument not of perceiving but of creating existence, and existence to be not the object but the subject of their consciousness-they want to be that God they created in their image and likeness, who creates a universe out of a void by means of an arbitrary whim.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (52% in)
  • They want to cheat the axiom of existence and consciousness, they want their consciousness to be an instrument not of perceiving but of creating existence, and existence to be not the object but the subject of their consciousness-they want to be that God they created in their image and likeness, who creates a universe out of a void by means of an arbitrary whim.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (52% in)
  • They want to cheat the axiom of existence and consciousness, they want their consciousness to be an instrument not of perceiving but of creating existence, and existence to be not the object but the subject of their consciousness-they want to be that God they created in their image and likeness, who creates a universe out of a void by means of an arbitrary whim.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (52% in)
  • They want an omnipotent power over existence; instead, they lose the power of their consciousness.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (52% in)
  • Whenever you committed the evil of refusing to think and to see, of exempting from the absolute of reality some one small wish of yours, whenever you chose to say: Let me withdraw from the judgment of reason the cookies I stole, or the existence of God, let me have my one irrational whim and I will be a man of reason about all else-that was the act of subverting your consciousness, the act of corrupting your mind.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (52% in)
  • 'We know that we know nothing,' they chatter, blanking out the fact that they are claiming knowledge-'There are no absolutes,' they chatter, blanking out the fact that they are uttering an absolute-'You cannot prove that you exist or that you're conscious,' they chatter, blanking out the fact that proof presupposes existence, consciousness and a complex chain of knowledge: the existence of something to know, of a consciousness able to know it, and of a knowledge that has learned to...
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (56% in)
  • ...fact that they are claiming knowledge-'There are no absolutes,' they chatter, blanking out the fact that they are uttering an absolute-'You cannot prove that you exist or that you're conscious,' they chatter, blanking out the fact that proof presupposes existence, consciousness and a complex chain of knowledge: the existence of something to know, of a consciousness able to know it, and of a knowledge that has learned to distinguish between such concepts as the proved and the unproved.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (56% in)
  • ...fact that they are claiming knowledge-'There are no absolutes,' they chatter, blanking out the fact that they are uttering an absolute-'You cannot prove that you exist or that you're conscious,' they chatter, blanking out the fact that proof presupposes existence, consciousness and a complex chain of knowledge: the existence of something to know, of a consciousness able to know it, and of a knowledge that has learned to distinguish between such concepts as the proved and the unproved.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (56% in)
  • "When a savage who has not learned to speak declares that existence must be proved, he is asking you to prove it by means of nonexistence-when he declares that your consciousness must be proved, he is asking you to prove it by means of unconsciousness-he is asking you to step into a void outside of existence and consciousness to give him proof of both-he is asking you to become a zero gaining knowledge about a zero, "When he declares that an axiom is a matter of arbitrary choice and he...
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (56% in)
  • "When a savage who has not learned to speak declares that existence must be proved, he is asking you to prove it by means of nonexistence-when he declares that your consciousness must be proved, he is asking you to prove it by means of unconsciousness-he is asking you to step into a void outside of existence and consciousness to give him proof of both-he is asking you to become a zero gaining knowledge about a zero, "When he declares that an axiom is a matter of arbitrary choice and he...
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (56% in)
  • ...be proved, he is asking you to prove it by means of nonexistence-when he declares that your consciousness must be proved, he is asking you to prove it by means of unconsciousness-he is asking you to step into a void outside of existence and consciousness to give him proof of both-he is asking you to become a zero gaining knowledge about a zero, "When he declares that an axiom is a matter of arbitrary choice and he doesn't choose to accept the axiom that he exists, he blanks out the...
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (57% in)
  • Identify the development of a human consciousness-and you will know the purpose of their creed.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (58% in)
  • He has arrested his mind at the level of a baby's, at the stage when a consciousness acquires its initial sensory perceptions and has not learned to distinguish solid objects.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (58% in)
  • If you wonder by what means they propose to do it, walk into any college classroom and you will hear your professors teaching your children that man can be certain of nothing, that his consciousness has no validity whatever, that he can learn no facts and no laws of existence, that he's incapable of knowing an objective reality.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (59% in)
  • Your consciousness, they tell you, consists of 'reflexes,' 'reactions,' 'experiences,' 'urges,' and 'drives' -and refuse to identify the means by which they acquired that knowledge, to identify the act they are performing when they tell it or the act you are performing when you listen.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (61% in)
  • To undercut your consciousness has always been their only purpose throughout the ages —and power, the power to rule you by force, has always been their only lust.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (63% in)
  • ...on the mud floors of their hovels, in terror that the devil might steal the soup they had worked eighteen hours to earn-to the seedy little smiling professor who assures you that your brain has no capacity to think, that you have no means of perception and must blindly obey the omnipotent will of that supernatural force: Society-all of it is the same performance for the same and only purpose: to reduce you to the kind of pulp that has surrendered the validity of its consciousness.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (63% in)
  • When you listen to a mystic's harangue on the impotence of the human mind and begin to doubt your consciousness, not his, when you permit your precariously semi-rational state to be shaken by any assertion and decide it is safer to trust his superior certainty and knowledge, the joke is on both of you: your sanction is the only source of certainty he has.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (63% in)
  • The supernatural power that a mystic dreads, the unknowable spirit he worships, the consciousness he considers omnipotent is-yours.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (63% in)
  • When a mystic declares that he feels the existence of a power superior to reason, he feels it all right, but that power is not an omniscient super-spirit of the universe, it is the consciousness of any passer-by to whom he has surrendered his own.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (64% in)
  • A mystic is driven by the urge to impress, to cheat, to flatter, to deceive, to force that omnipotent consciousness of others.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (64% in)
  • To control the consciousness of others becomes his only passion; power-lust is a weed that grows only in the vacant lots of an abandoned mind.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (64% in)
  • He wants them to surrender their consciousness to his assertions, his edicts, his wishes, his whims-as his consciousness is surrendered to theirs.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (64% in)
  • He wants them to surrender their consciousness to his assertions, his edicts, his wishes, his whims-as his consciousness is surrendered to theirs.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (64% in)
  • What he seeks is power over reality and over men's means of perceiving it, their mind, the power to interpose his will between existence and consciousness, as if, by agreeing to fake the reality he orders them to fake, men would, in fact, create it.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (65% in)
  • As a being of volitional consciousness, he knows that he must know his own value in order to maintain his own life.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (81% in)
  • You still retain a sense-not as firm as a memory, but diffused like the pain of hopeless longing-that somewhere in the starting years of your childhood, before you had learned to submit, to absorb the terror of unreason and to doubt the value of your mind, you had known a radiant state of existence, you had known the independence of a rational consciousness facing an open universe.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (83% in)
  • Admit that the whole of your struggle, your doubts, your fakes, your evasions, was a desperate quest for escape from the responsibility of a volitional consciousness-a quest for automatic knowledge, for instinctive action, for intuitive certainty-and while you called it a longing for the state of an angel, what you were seeking was the state of an animal.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (83% in)
  • But a breach of morality is the conscious choice of an action you know to be evil, or a willful evasion of knowledge, a suspension of sight and of thought.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (84% in)
  • It was the fact that Dr. Stadler had not cried it, but had said it in a flat, cold, suddenly and fully conscious voice, that brought a chill moment of silence as the whole room's answer.
    3.8 Part 3 Chapter 8 — The Egoist (9% in)
  • She knew that his eyes were grasping this moment, then sweeping over its past and its future, that a lightning process of calculation was bringing it into his conscious control-and by the time a fold of his shirt moved with the motion of his breath, he knew the sum-and the sum was a smile of radiant greeting.
    3.8 Part 3 Chapter 8 — The Egoist (35% in)
  • It had been easy, because she had felt as if she were in some dreary non-world, where her words and actions were not facts any longer-not reflections of reality, but only distorted postures in one of those side-show mirrors that project deformity for the perception of beings whose consciousness is not to be treated as consciousness.
    3.8 Part 3 Chapter 8 — The Egoist (70% in)
  • It had been easy, because she had felt as if she were in some dreary non-world, where her words and actions were not facts any longer-not reflections of reality, but only distorted postures in one of those side-show mirrors that project deformity for the perception of beings whose consciousness is not to be treated as consciousness.
    3.8 Part 3 Chapter 8 — The Egoist (70% in)
  • Galt walked as if he were both unconscious of his body and tremendously conscious of his pride in it.
    3.8 Part 3 Chapter 8 — The Egoist (75% in)
  • Galt walked as if he were both unconscious of his body and tremendously conscious of his pride in it.
    3.8 Part 3 Chapter 8 — The Egoist (75% in)
  • Their expressions ranged from blank apathy to the relieved look of cheats who had believed that the game could end no other way and were making no effort to contest it or regret it-to the petulant blindness of Lawson, who refused to be conscious of anything-to the peculiar intensity of Jim, whose face suggested a secret smile.
    3.9 Part 3 Chapter 9 — The Generator (40% in)
  • He was in danger; there was no time and no room in her consciousness to waste emotion on the actions of the subhuman.
    3.9 Part 3 Chapter 9 — The Generator (47% in)
  • Some conscious stress in the sweep of his arm made it the gesture of a d'Anconia, welcoming the arrival of a long-awaited traveler at the gates of his own domain.
    3.9 Part 3 Chapter 9 — The Generator (61% in)
  • They could tell nothing, except that his glance was steady and fully conscious.
    3.9 Part 3 Chapter 9 — The Generator (74% in)
  • There were dark rings under his eyes, but the eyes were clear and conscious.
    3.9 Part 3 Chapter 9 — The Generator (83% in)
  • The man was not a trained electrician; he had been chosen, not for his knowledge, but for his uncritical capacity for pushing any buttons; the effort he needed to learn his task was such that his consciousness could be relied upon to have no room for anything else.
    3.9 Part 3 Chapter 9 — The Generator (86% in)
  • In the incoherent dimness of his consciousness, in some wordless, shapeless, unintelligible manner, even he suddenly grasped the meaning of what was occurring in that cellar.
    3.9 Part 3 Chapter 9 — The Generator (89% in)
  • It was not by means of words that this knowledge confronted his consciousness: as all his knowledge had consisted of emotions, so now he was held by an emotion and a vision that he had no power to dispel.
    3.9 Part 3 Chapter 9 — The Generator (95% in)
  • Calmly and impersonally, she, who would have hesitated to fire at an animal, pulled the trigger and fired straight at the heart of a man who had wanted to exist without the responsibility of consciousness.
    3.10 Part 3 Chapter 10 — In the Name of the Best Among Us (6% in)
  • By the time the four survivors of the garrison began to reassemble the pieces of their consciousness, their figures were stretched on the floor, bound and gagged; the fifth one was left standing, his hands tied behind his back.
    3.10 Part 3 Chapter 10 — In the Name of the Best Among Us (30% in)
  • The too-conscious steadiness of Hugh Akston's voice confessed at what cost 3.10 Part 3 Chapter 10 — In the Name of the Best Among Us (57% in)

There are no more uses of "conscious" in Atlas Shrugged.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®