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contradict
used in Atlas Shrugged

56 uses
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Definition
disagree
in various senses, including:
  • to say something is not true — as in "She contradicted his testimony."
  • to say something else is true when both can't be true — as in "I don't believe her. She contradicted herself as she told us what happened."
  • to be in conflict with — as in "Her assertions contradict accepted scientific principles."
  • Contradictions do not exist.
    1.7 Part 1 Chapter 7 — The Exploiters and the Exploited (67% in)
  • PART I NON-CONTRADICTION CHAPTER I .
    1.1 Part 1 Chapter 1 — The Theme (0% in)
  • But, look .... isn't that sort of a contradiction?
    1.6 Part 1 Chapter 6 — The Non-Commercial (18% in)
  • You do not grasp the fact that the universe is a solid contradiction.
    1.6 Part 1 Chapter 6 — The Non-Commercial (18% in)
  • "A contradiction of what?" asked the matron.
    1.6 Part 1 Chapter 6 — The Non-Commercial (18% in)
  • Whenever you think that you are facing a contradiction, check your premises.
    1.7 Part 1 Chapter 7 — The Exploiters and the Exploited (67% in)
  • That he waited for her impatiently, when he stood in the rain on the sidewalk, that she was the one person he needed tonight, did not disturb him or strike him as a contradiction.
    1.9 Part 1 Chapter 9 — The Sacred and the Profane (20% in)
  • The unnamed and the unuttered could not clash into a contradiction.
    1.9 Part 1 Chapter 9 — The Sacred and the Profane (20% in)
  • Have you ever heard of The Metaphysical Contradictions of the Universe, by Dr. Simon Pritchett?
    1.9 Part 1 Chapter 9 — The Sacred and the Profane (31% in)
  • There is only one helpful suggestion that I can give you: By the essence and nature of existence, contradictions cannot exist.
    1.10 Part 1 Chapter 10 — Wyatt's Torch (89% in)
  • These discoveries have led scientists to contradictions which are impossible, according to the human mind, but which exist in reality nonetheless.
    2.1 Part 2 Chapter 1 — The Man Who Belonged on Earth (6% in)
  • Everything is a contradiction of everything else.
    2.1 Part 2 Chapter 1 — The Man Who Belonged on Earth (6% in)
  • Nothing exists but contradictions.
    2.1 Part 2 Chapter 1 — The Man Who Belonged on Earth (6% in)
  • The feeblest imbecile should be able to see the glaring contradictions in every one of your statements.
    2.1 Part 2 Chapter 1 — The Man Who Belonged on Earth (18% in)
  • He wanted you to grant him your respect, in spite of and in contradiction to his actions.
    2.1 Part 2 Chapter 1 — The Man Who Belonged on Earth (96% in)
  • Well, I'll just say that 'Governmental scientific inquiry' is a contradiction in terms.
    2.2 Part 2 Chapter 2 — The Aristocracy of Pull (4% in)
  • ...he said calmly, very simply-and the only note of a personal bond between them was that tone of sincerity which comes with a direct, unqualifiedly rational statement and implies the same honesty of mind in the listener-"You know, I think that the only real moral crime that one man can commit against another is the attempt to create, by his words or actions, an impression of the contradictory, the impossible, the irrational, and thus shake the concept of rationality in his victim."
    2.4 Part 2 Chapter 4 — The Sanction of the Victim (79% in)
  • Observe the ugly mess which most men make of their sex lives-and observe the mess of contradictions which they hold as their moral philosophy.
    2.4 Part 2 Chapter 4 — The Sanction of the Victim (84% in)
  • That summer, when he grew exasperated at Taggart's delays and contradictions over an order of rail for a new cutoff, an order which Taggart kept placing, altering and withdrawing, somebody told him that if he wished to get any sense or action out of Taggart Transcontinental, he'd better speak to Jim's sister.
    2.6 Part 2 Chapter 6 — Miracle Metal (87% in)
  • He knew that the Board would rule against him; he knew that the key to the dark, capricious mystery of the Board's contradictory decisions was the secret power of pull.
    2.7 Part 2 Chapter 7 — The Moratorium on Brains (77% in)
  • Contradictions don't exist.
    2.8 Part 2 Chapter 8 — By Our Love (44% in)
  • That's the contradiction you had to resolve sooner or later, Miss Taggart.
    3.1 Part 3 Chapter 1 — Atlantis (17% in)
  • .... who destroyed my Line...... " "Why, no. It was the contradiction.
    3.1 Part 3 Chapter 1 — Atlantis (17% in)
  • When he preaches contradictions, he does so in the knowledge that someone will accept the burden of the impossible, someone will make it work for him at the price of his own suffering or life; destruction is the price of any contradiction.
    3.1 Part 3 Chapter 1 — Atlantis (74% in)
  • When he preaches contradictions, he does so in the knowledge that someone will accept the burden of the impossible, someone will make it work for him at the price of his own suffering or life; destruction is the price of any contradiction.
    3.1 Part 3 Chapter 1 — Atlantis (75% in)
  • And when they see the absolute reality of their non-absolute world, I will not be there and it will not be I who will pay the price of their contradictions.
    3.1 Part 3 Chapter 1 — Atlantis (81% in)
  • But if the body is evil; then so are those who provide the means of its survival, so is material wealth and those who produce it-and if moral values are set in contradiction to our physical existence, then it's right that rewards should be unearned, that virtue should consist of the undone, that there should be no tie between achievement and profit, that the inferior animals who're able to produce should serve those superior beings whose superiority in spirit consists of incompetence...
    3.3 Part 3 Chapter 3 — Anti-Greed (91% in)
  • Then, one sleepless night, she realized that her effort to fulfill that duty consisted of turning away whenever people discussed his job, of refusing to look at newspaper mentions of Taggart Transcontinental, of slamming her mind shut against any evidence and every contradiction.
    3.4 Part 3 Chapter 4 — Anti-Life (36% in)
  • ...the shelves, threw thousands of electric circuits into motion, made thousands of contacts and broke as many others, set dozens of switches to clear a chosen course and dozens of signals to light it, with no error left possible, no chance, no contradiction —an enormous complexity of thought condensed into one movement of a human hand to set and insure the course of a train, that hundreds of trains might safely rush by, that thousands of tons of metal and lives might pass in speeding...
    3.5 Part 3 Chapter 5 — Their Brothers' Keepers (80% in)
  • He was seeing the final contradiction, the grotesque absurdity at the end of the irrationalists' game: the men in Washington had hoped to hold him by prompting these three to try for the role of hostages.
    3.6 Part 3 Chapter 6 — The Concerto of Deliverance (30% in)
  • He had never loved his mills as he did in that moment, for-seeing them by an act of his own vision, cleared of all but his own code of values, in a luminous reality that held no contradictions-he was seeing the reason of his love: the mills were an achievement of his mind, devoted to his enjoyment of existence, erected in a rational world to deal with rational men.
    3.6 Part 3 Chapter 6 — The Concerto of Deliverance (69% in)
  • Such a being is a metaphysical monstrosity, struggling to oppose, negate and contradict the fact of his own existence, running blindly amuck on a trail of destruction, capable of nothing but pain.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (19% in)
  • If nothing exists, there can be no consciousness: a consciousness with nothing to be conscious of is a contradiction in terms.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (21% in)
  • A consciousness conscious of nothing but itself is a contradiction in terms: before it could identify itself as consciousness, it had to be conscious of something.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (21% in)
  • Logic is the art of non-contradictory identification.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (23% in)
  • A contradiction cannot exist.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (23% in)
  • An atom is itself, and so is the universe; neither can contradict its own identity; nor can a part contradict the whole.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (23% in)
  • An atom is itself, and so is the universe; neither can contradict its own identity; nor can a part contradict the whole.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (23% in)
  • No concept man forms is valid unless he integrates it without contradiction into the total sum of his knowledge.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (23% in)
  • To arrive at a contradiction is to confess an error in one's thinking; to maintain a contradiction is to abdicate one's mind and to evict oneself from the realm of reality.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (23% in)
  • To arrive at a contradiction is to confess an error in one's thinking; to maintain a contradiction is to abdicate one's mind and to evict oneself from the realm of reality.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (23% in)
  • But a 'moral commandment' is a contradiction in terms.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (25% in)
  • If you choose a mix of contradictions, it will clog your motor, corrode your transmission and wreck you on your first attempt to move with a machine which you, the driver, have corrupted.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (30% in)
  • Happiness is a state of non contradictory joy-a joy without penalty or guilt, a joy that does not clash with any of your values and does not work for your own destruction, not the joy of escaping from your mind, but of using your mind's fullest power, not the joy of faking reality, but of achieving values that are real, not the joy of a drunkard, but of a producer.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (30% in)
  • Just as there are no contradictions in my values and no conflicts among my desires-so there are no victims and no conflicts of interest among rational men, men who do not desire the unearned and do not view one another with a cannibal's lust, men who neither make sacrifices nor accept them.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (31% in)
  • When you declare that men are irrational animals and propose to treat them as such, you define thereby your own character and can no longer claim the sanction of reason-as no advocate of contradictions can claim it.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (32% in)
  • "The name of this monstrous absurdity is Original Sin, "A sin without volition is a slap at morality and an insolent contradiction in terms: that which is outside the possibility of choice is outside the province of morality.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (35% in)
  • They have taught him that his body and his consciousness are two enemies engaged in deadly conflict, two antagonists of opposite natures, contradictory claims, incompatible needs, that to benefit one is to injure the other, that his soul belongs to a supernatural realm, but his body is an evil prison holding it in bondage to this earth-and that the good is to defeat his body, to undermine it by years of patient struggle, digging his way to that glorious jail-break which leads into the...
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (37% in)
  • A man whose values are given no expression in material form, whose existence is unrelated to his ideals, whose actions contradict his convictions, is a cheap little hypocriteyet that is the man who obeys your morality and divorces his values from matter.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (41% in)
  • The mystics of spirit declare that they possess an extra sense you lack: this special sixth sense consists of contradicting the whole of the knowledge of your five.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (49% in)
  • The nature of an action is caused and determined by the nature of the entities that act; a thing cannot act in contradiction to its nature.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (53% in)
  • Somewhere in. the distant reaches of his childhood, when his own understanding of reality clashed with the assertions of others, with their arbitrary orders and contradictory demands, he gave in to so craven a fear of dependence that he renounced his rational faculty.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (63% in)
  • What blank-out permitted you to hope that you could get away with this muck of contradictions and to plan it as an ideal society, when the 'No' of your victims was sufficient to demolish the whole of your structure?
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (71% in)
  • And he makes his fatal error when he switches this gauge protecting his life into the service of his own destruction, when he chooses a standard contradicting existence and sets his self-esteem against reality.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (81% in)
  • No child is afraid of nature; it is your fear of men that will vanish, the fear that has stunted your soul, the fear you acquired in your early encounters with the incomprehensible, the unpredictable, the contradictory, the arbitrary, the hidden, the faked, the irrational in men.
    3.7 Part 3 Chapter 7 — "This is John Galt Speaking" (98% in)
  • He had marked and crossed out the contradictions in its statements that had once been the cause of its destruction.
    3.10 Part 3 Chapter 10 — In the Name of the Best Among Us (95% in)

There are no more uses of "contradict" in Atlas Shrugged.

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