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audacious
used in The Age of Innocence

4 uses
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Definition
bold and daring (inclined to take risks) — especially in violating social convention in a manner that could offend others
  • "Janey!" said her mother; and Miss Archer blushed and tried to look audacious.
    Chapter 5 (73% in)
  • ...a father mysteriously discredited, and neither money nor position enough to make people forget it, had allied herself with the head of the wealthy Mingott line, married two of her daughters to "foreigners" (an Italian marquis and an English banker), and put the crowning touch to her audacities by building a large house of pale cream-coloured stone (when brown sandstone seemed as much the only wear as a frock-coat in the afternoon) in an inaccessible wilderness near the Central Park.
    Chapter 2 (20% in)
  • Wandering on to the bouton d'or drawing-room (where Beaufort had had the audacity to hang "Love Victorious," the much-discussed nude of Bouguereau) Archer found Mrs. Welland and her daughter standing near the ball-room door.
    Chapter 3 (55% in)
  • To counteract the audacity of this proceeding he led her to a bamboo sofa in a less secluded part of the conservatory, and sitting down beside her broke a lily-of-the-valley from her bouquet.
    Chapter 3 (83% in)

There are no more uses of "audacious" in The Age of Innocence.

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