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sordid
used in The Picture of Dorian Gray - 20 chapter version

6 uses
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Definition
morally degraded; or foul and repulsive
  • I felt that this grey, monstrous London of ours, with its myriads of people, its sordid sinners, and its splendid sins, as you once phrased it, must have something in store for me.
    Chapter 4 (25% in)
  • If this girl can give a soul to those who have lived without one, if she can create the sense of beauty in people whose lives have been sordid and ugly, if she can strip them of their selfishness and lend them tears for sorrows that are not their own, she is worthy of all your adoration, worthy of the adoration of the world.
    Chapter 7 (9% in)
  • You went to the Opera while Sibyl Vane was lying dead in some sordid lodging?
    Chapter 9 (10% in)
  • They wondered how one so charming and graceful as he was could have escaped the stain of an age that was at once sordid and sensual.
    Chapter 11 (5% in)
  • There were moments, indeed, at night, when, lying sleepless in his own delicately-scented chamber, or in the sordid room of the little ill-famed tavern near the Docks, which, under an assumed name, and in disguise, it was his habit to frequent, he would think of the ruin he had brought upon his soul, with a pity that was all the more poignant because it was purely selfish.
    Chapter 11 (8% in)
  • Lying back in the hansom, with his hat pulled over his forehead, Dorian Gray watched with listless eyes the sordid shame of the great city, and now and then he repeated to himself the words that Lord Henry had said to him on the first day they had met, "To cure the soul by means of the senses, and the senses by means of the soul."
    Chapter 16 (3% in)

There are no more uses of "sordid" in The Picture of Dorian Gray - 20 chapter version.

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