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resent
used in The Mill on the Floss

16 uses
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Definition
to feel anger or unhappiness at having to accept something — often something seen as unjust or something that creates jealousy
  • All hard looks were pain to Maggie, but her self-reproach was too strong for resentment.
    7.2 — Book 7 Chapter 2 — St. Ogg's Passes Judgment (46% in)
  • The tears flowed so plentifully that Maggie saw nothing around her for the next ten minutes; but by that time resentment began to give way to the desire of reconciliation, and she jumped from her bough to look for Tom.
    1.6 — Book 1 Chapter 6 — The Aunts and Uncles Are Coming (46% in)
  • The knife would do not good on the ground there; it wouldn't vex Tom; and pride or resentment was a feeble passion in Bob's mind compared with the love of a pocket-knife.
    1.6 — Book 1 Chapter 6 — The Aunts and Uncles Are Coming (92% in)
  • He must have been an extreme milksop not to say angrily, "Look there, now!" especially when his resentment was sanctioned, as it was, by general disapprobation of Maggie's behavior.
    1.9 — Book 1 Chapter 9 — To Garum Firs (66% in)
  • Their natural antipathy of temperament made resentment an easy passage to hatred, and in Philip the transition seemed to have begun; there was no malignity in his disposition, but there was a susceptibility that made him peculiarly liable to a strong sense of repulsion.
    2.5 — Book 2 Chapter 5 — Maggie's Second Visit (2% in)
  • The natural strength and firmness of his nature was beginning to assert itself, urged by the double stimulus of resentment against his aunts, and the sense that he must behave like a man and take care of his mother.
    3.2 — Book 3 Chapter 2 — Mrs. Tulliver's Teraphim, or Household Gods (76% in)
  • The implied reproaches against her father—her father, who was lying there in a sort of living death—neutralized all her pity for griefs about tablecloths and china; and her anger on her father's account was heightened by some egoistic resentment at Tom's silent concurrence with her mother in shutting her out from the common calamity.
    3.2 — Book 3 Chapter 2 — Mrs. Tulliver's Teraphim, or Household Gods (83% in)
  • Since these were the consequences of going to law, his father was really blamable, as his aunts and uncles had always said he was; and it was a significant indication of Tom's character, that though he thought his aunts ought to do something more for his mother, he felt nothing like Maggie's violent resentment against them for showing no eager tenderness and generosity.
    3.5 — Book 3 Chapter 5 — Tom Applies His Knife to the Oyster (5% in)
  • Maggie's cheek flushed and her lip quivered with conflicting resentment and affection, and a certain awe as well as admiration of Tom's firmer and more effective character.
    3.5 — Book 3 Chapter 5 — Tom Applies His Knife to the Oyster (90% in)
  • With the last words the resentment was rising again.
    3.5 — Book 3 Chapter 5 — Tom Applies His Knife to the Oyster (92% in)
  • "I don't wish to use deceit," said Maggie, flushing into resentment at hearing this word applied to her conduct.
    5.5 — Book 5 Chapter 5 — The Cloven Tree (38% in)
  • If she had felt that she was entirely wrong, and that Tom had been entirely right, she could sooner have recovered more inward harmony; but now her penitence and submission were constantly obstructed by resentment that would present itself to her no otherwise than as a just indignation.
    5.5 — Book 5 Chapter 5 — The Cloven Tree (98% in)
  • "I don't mean your resentment toward them," said Philip, who had his reasons for some sympathy with this view of Tom, "though a feeling of revenge is not worth much, that you should care to keep it.
    6.8 — Book 6 Chapter 8 — Wakem in a New Light (48% in)
  • "Not she!" said Wakem, rising again, and forgetting everything else in a burst of resentful pride, half fatherly, half personal.
    6.8 — Book 6 Chapter 8 — Wakem in a New Light (58% in)
  • Not a word was spoken till they were out in the lane, and had walked four or five yards, when Maggie, who had been looking straight before her all the while, turned again to walk back, saying, with haughty resentment,— "There is no need for me to go any farther.
    6.11 — Book 6 Chapter 11 — In the Lane (21% in)
  • The strength that had come from resentment was all gone, and her lips were quivering visibly.
    6.11 — Book 6 Chapter 11 — In the Lane (32% in)

There are no more uses of "resent" in The Mill on the Floss.

Typical Usage  (best examples)