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dwell
used in The Mill on the Floss

17 uses
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1  —1 use as in:
a modest dwelling
Definition
a house or shelter in which someone lives
  • Book IV The Valley of Humiliation Chapter I A Variation of Protestantism Unknown to Bossuet Journeying down the Rhone on a summer's day, you have perhaps felt the sunshine made dreary by those ruined villages which stud the banks in certain parts of its course, telling how the swift river once rose, like an angry, destroying god, sweeping down the feeble generations whose breath is in their nostrils, and making their dwellings a desolation.
    4.1 -- Book 4 Chapter 1 -- A Variation of Protestantism Unknown to Bossuet (4% in)

There are no more uses of "dwelling" flagged with this meaning in The Mill on the Floss.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
?  —16 uses
exact meaning not specified
  • To the eyes that have dwelt on the past, there is no thorough repair.
    7.5 -- Book 7 Chapter 5 -- The Last Conflict (97% in)
  • Even in this leafless time of departing February it is pleasant to look at,—perhaps the chill, damp season adds a charm to the trimly kept, comfortable dwelling-house, as old as the elms and chestnuts that shelter it from the northern blast.
    1.1 -- Book 1 Chapter 1 -- Outside Dorlcote Mill (38% in)
  • He was about to get down and lead his horse through the damp dirt of the hollow farmyard, shadowed drearily by the large half-timbered buildings, up to the long line of tumble-down dwelling-houses standing on a raised causeway; but the timely appearance of a cowboy saved him that frustration of a plan he had determined on,—namely, not to get down from his horse during this visit.
    1.8 -- Book 1 Chapter 8 -- Mr. Tulliver Shows His Weaker Side (42% in)
  • His imagination did not dwell on the outward calamity and its future effect on Tom's life, but it made vividly present to him the probable state of Tom's feeling.
    2.6 -- Book 2 Chapter 6 -- A Love-Scene (19% in)
  • In heaven ought to be thy dwelling, and all earthly things are to be looked on as they forward thy journey thither.
    4.3 -- Book 4 Chapter 3 -- A Voice from the Past (64% in)
  • The temptations of beauty are much dwelt upon, but I fancy they only bear the same relation to those of ugliness, as the temptation to excess at a feast, where the delights are varied for eye and ear as well as palate, bears to the temptations that assail the desperation of hunger.
    5.3 -- Book 5 Chapter 3 -- The Wavering Balance (91% in)
  • It was not that she thought distinctly of Mr. Stephen Guest, or dwelt on the indications that he looked at her with admiration; it was rather that she felt the half-remote presence of a world of love and beauty and delight, made up of vague, mingled images from all the poetry and romance she had ever read, or had ever woven in her dreamy reveries.
    6.3 -- Book 6 Chapter 3 -- Confidential Moments (21% in)
  • But everything was not strange to her in this new room; the first thing her eyes dwelt on was the large old Bible, and the sight was not likely to disperse the old memories.
    6.4 -- Book 6 Chapter 4 -- Brother and Sister (12% in)
  • He could not dwell on the fact that he himself had not changed; for that too would have had the air of an appeal.
    6.7 -- Book 6 Chapter 7 -- Philip Re-enters (33% in)
  • He watched his father get up, and walk slowly round, good-naturedly dwelling on the pictures much longer than his amount of genuine taste for landscape would have prompted, till he stopped before a stand on which two pictures were placed,—one much larger than the other, the smaller one in a leather case.
    6.8 -- Book 6 Chapter 8 -- Wakem in a New Light (14% in)
  • Not that anger, on account of spurned beauty can dwell in the celestial breasts of charitable ladies, but rather that the errors of persons who have once been much admired necessarily take a deeper tinge from the mere force of contrast; and also, that to-day Maggie's conspicuous position, for the first time, made evident certain characteristics which were subsequently felt to have an explanatory bearing.
    6.9 -- Book 6 Chapter 9 -- Charity in Full-Dress (15% in)
  • Her breath was on his face, his lips were very near hers, but there was a great dread dwelling in his love for her.
    6.11 -- Book 6 Chapter 11 -- In the Lane (68% in)
  • Maggie was only dimly conscious of the banks, as they passed them, and dwelt with no recognition on the villages; she knew there were several to be passed before they reached Luckreth, where they always stopped and left the boat.
    6.13 -- Book 6 Chapter 13 -- Borne Along by the Tide (58% in)
  • Life stretched before her as one act of penitence; and all she craved, as she dwelt on her future lot, was something to guarantee her from more falling; her own weakness haunted her like a vision of hideous possibilities, that made no peace conceivable except such as lay in the sense of a sure refuge.
    7.2 -- Book 7 Chapter 2 -- St. Ogg's Passes Judgment (34% in)
  • But she had no sooner passed beyond the narrower streets which she had to thread from Bob's dwelling, than she became aware of unusual glances cast at her; and this consciousness made her hurry along nervously, afraid to look to right or left.
    7.2 -- Book 7 Chapter 2 -- St. Ogg's Passes Judgment (44% in)
  • Maggie dwelt the longest on the feeling which had made her come back to her mother and brother, which made her cling to all the memories of the past.
    7.2 -- Book 7 Chapter 2 -- St. Ogg's Passes Judgment (58% in)

There are no more uses of "dwell" in The Mill on the Floss.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®