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persecution
used in The Mill on the Floss

2 uses
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Definition
very bad and unfair treatment of others — usually because of race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, or political beliefs
  • For example, she not only determined to work at plain sewing, that she might contribute something toward the fund in the tin box, but she went, in the first instance, in her zeal of self-mortification, to ask for it at a linen shop in St. Ogg's, instead of getting it in a more quiet and indirect way; and could see nothing but what was entirely wrong and unkind, nay, persecuting, in Tom's reproof of her for this unnecessary act.
    4.3 -- Book 4 Chapter 3 -- A Voice from the Past (87% in)
  • ...perceives at once that there is a design in it which makes it eminently worthy of a large-headed, long-limbed young man; for you see that Lucy wants the scissors, and is compelled, reluctant as she may be, to shake her ringlets back, raise her soft hazel eyes, smile playfully down on the face that is so very nearly on a level with her knee, and holding out her little shell-pink palm, to say,— "My scissors, please, if you can renounce the great pleasure of persecuting my poor Minny."
    6.1 -- Book 6 Chapter 1 -- A Duet in Paradise (7% in)

There are no more uses of "persecution" in The Mill on the Floss.

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