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acquit
used in The Mill on the Floss

2 uses
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1  —1 use as in:
she acquitted herself well
Definition
to handle oneself in a specified way — which is typically in a positive way
  • But a man who had had a university education could teach anything he liked; especially a man like Stelling, who had made a speech at a Mudport dinner on a political occasion, and had acquitted himself so well that it was generally remarked, this son-in-law of Timpson's was a sharp fellow.
    1.3 — Book 1 Chapter 3 — Mr. Riley Gives His Advice Concerning.... (89% in)
acquitted = handled (conducted or behaved)
There are no more uses of "acquit" flagged with this meaning in The Mill on the Floss.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
?  —1 use
exact meaning not specified
  • It seemed a wrong toward him that his uncle Deane had no confidence in him,—did not see at once that he should acquit himself well, which Tom himself was as certain of as of the daylight.
    3.5 — Book 3 Chapter 5 — Tom Applies His Knife to the Oyster (77% in)

There are no more uses of "acquit" in The Mill on the Floss.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®