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Napoleon Bonaparte
used in The Count of Monte Cristo

47 uses
  • He resembles the old Conventionalist of '93, who said to Napoleon, in 1814, 'You bend because your empire is a young stem, weakened by rapid growth.
    Chapters 73-74 (79% in)
  • Then added in a low whisper, "You understand that, on account of your uncle, M. Policar Morrel, who served under the other government, and who does not altogether conceal what he thinks on the subject, you are strongly suspected of regretting the abdication of Napoleon.
    Chapters 5-6 (47% in)
  • ...would be compelled to own, were they here, that all true devotion was on our side, since we were content to follow the fortunes of a falling monarch, while they, on the contrary, made their fortune by worshipping the rising sun; yes, yes, they could not help admitting that the king, for whom we sacrificed rank, wealth, and station was truly our 'Louis the well-beloved,' while their wretched usurper his been, and ever will be, to them their evil genius, their 'Napoleon the accursed.'
    Chapters 5-6 (62% in)
  • Napoleon is the Mahomet of the West, and is worshipped by his commonplace but ambitions followers, not only as a leader and lawgiver, but also as the personification of equality.
    Chapters 5-6 (65% in)
  • "He!" cried the marquise: "Napoleon the type of equality!
    Chapters 5-6 (65% in)
  • Nay, madame; I would place each of these heroes on his right pedestal—that of Robespierre on his scaffold in the Place Louis Quinze; that of Napoleon on the column of the Place Vendome.
    Chapters 5-6 (66% in)
  • Observe," said Villefort, smiling, "I do not mean to deny that both these men were revolutionary scoundrels, and that the 9th Thermidor and the 4th of April, in the year 1814, were lucky days for France, worthy of being gratefully remembered by every friend to monarchy and civil order; and that explains how it comes to pass that, fallen, as I trust he is forever, Napoleon has still retained a train of parasitical satellites.
    Chapters 5-6 (67% in)
  • Still, marquise, it has been so with other usurpers—Cromwell, for instance, who was not half so bad as Napoleon, had his partisans and advocates.
    Chapters 5-6 (68% in)
  • Napoleon, in the Island of Elba, is too near France, and his proximity keeps up the hopes of his partisans.
    Chapters 5-6 (74% in)
  • "Unfortunately," said Villefort, "there are the treaties of 1814, and we cannot molest Napoleon without breaking those compacts."
    Chapters 5-6 (76% in)
  • "Well," said the marquise, "it seems probable that, by the aid of the Holy Alliance, we shall be rid of Napoleon; and we must trust to the vigilance of M. de Villefort to purify Marseilles of his partisans.
    Chapters 5-6 (76% in)
  • Suppose, for instance, the prisoner, as is more than probable, to have served under Napoleon—well, can you expect for an instant, that one accustomed, at the word of his commander, to rush fearlessly on the very bayonets of his foe, will scruple more to drive a stiletto into the heart of one he knows to be his personal enemy, than to slaughter his fellow-creatures, merely because bidden to do so by one he is bound to obey?
    Chapters 5-6 (81% in)
  • He had learned that Dantes had been taken to prison, and he had gone to all his friends, and the influential persons of the city; but the report was already in circulation that Dantes was arrested as a Bonapartist agent; and as the most sanguine looked upon any attempt of Napoleon to remount the throne as impossible, he met with nothing but refusal, and had returned home in despair, declaring that the matter was serious and that nothing more could be done.
    Chapters 9-10 (33% in)
  • We will leave Villefort on the road to Paris, travelling—thanks to trebled fees—with all speed, and passing through two or three apartments, enter at the Tuileries the little room with the arched window, so well known as having been the favorite closet of Napoleon and Louis XVIII.
    Chapters 9-10 (40% in)
  • "Why, this is the way of it," said the minister, with the gravest air in the world: "Napoleon lately had a review, and as two or three of his old veterans expressed a desire to return to France, he gave them their dismissal, and exhorted them to 'serve the good king.'
    Chapters 9-10 (64% in)
  • —Louis XVIII. advanced a step, and folded his arms over his chest as Napoleon would have done.
    Chapters 11-12 (12% in)
  • In fact, the minister, who, in the plenitude of his power, had been unable to unearth Napoleon's secret, might in despair at his own downfall interrogate Dantes and so lay bare the motives of Villefort's plot.
    Chapters 11-12 (24% in)
  • Napoleon would, doubtless, have deprived Villefort of his office had it not been for Noirtier, who was all powerful at court, and thus the Girondin of '93 and the Senator of 1806 protected him who so lately had been his protector.
    Chapters 13-14 (3% in)
  • , and you did not show any favor—it was your duty; to-day you serve Napoleon, and you ought to protect him—it is equally your duty; I come, therefore, to ask what has become of him?
    Chapters 13-14 (14% in)
  • The miraculous return of Napoleon has conquered me, the legitimate monarch is he who is loved by his people.
    Chapters 13-14 (19% in)
  • The order of imprisonment came from high authority, and the order for his liberation must proceed from the same source; and, as Napoleon has scarcely been reinstated a fortnight, the letters have not yet been forwarded.
    Chapters 13-14 (23% in)
  • Villefort dictated a petition, in which, from an excellent intention, no doubt, Dantes' patriotic services were exaggerated, and he was made out one of the most active agents of Napoleon's return.
    Chapters 13-14 (29% in)
  • Danglars comprehended the full extent of the wretched fate that overwhelmed Dantes; and, when Napoleon returned to France, he, after the manner of mediocre minds, termed the coincidence, "a decree of Providence."
    Chapters 13-14 (34% in)
  • But when Napoleon returned to Paris, Danglars' heart failed him, and he lived in constant fear of Dantes' return on a mission of vengeance.
    Chapters 13-14 (35% in)
  • He therefore informed M. Morrel of his wish to quit the sea, and obtained a recommendation from him to a Spanish merchant, into whose service he entered at the end of March, that is, ten or twelve days after Napoleon's return.
    Chapters 13-14 (36% in)
  • Old Dantes, who was only sustained by hope, lost all hope at Napoleon's downfall.
    Chapters 13-14 (43% in)
  • It was at this period I learned that the destiny which seemed subservient to every wish formed by Napoleon, had bestowed on him a son, named king of Rome even in his cradle.
    Chapters 15-16 (70% in)
  • Then who reigns in France at this moment—Napoleon II.
    Chapters 15-16 (70% in)
  • Because in 1807 I dreamed of the very plan Napoleon tried to realize in 1811; because, like Machiavelli, I desired to alter the political face of Italy, and instead of allowing it to be split up into a quantity of petty principalities, each held by some weak or tyrannical ruler, I sought to form one large, compact, and powerful empire; and, lastly, because I fancied I had found my Caesar Borgia in a crowned simpleton, who feigned to enter into my views only to betray me.
    Chapters 15-16 (72% in)
  • , but it will never succeed now, for they attempted it fruitlessly, and Napoleon was unable to complete his work.
    Chapters 15-16 (73% in)
  • Napoleon certainly he knew something of, inasmuch as he had seen and spoken with him; but of Clement VII. and Alexander VI. he knew nothing.
    Chapters 15-16 (74% in)
  • I resolved to set out, and did set out at that very instant, carrying with me the beginning of my great work, the unity of the Italian kingdom; but for some time the imperial police (who at this period, quite contrary to what Napoleon desired so soon as he had a son born to him, wished for a partition of provinces) had their eyes on me; and my hasty departure, the cause of which they were unable to guess, having aroused their suspicions, I was arrested at the very moment I was leaving...
    Chapters 17-18 (96% in)
  • He left Gorgone on his right and La Pianosa on his left, and went towards the country of Paoli and Napoleon.
    Chapters 22-23 (75% in)
  • "I beg your pardon, sir," said the honest fellow, in almost breathless haste, "but I believe you made a mistake; you intended to give me a two-franc piece, and see, you gave me a double Napoleon."
    Chapters 25-26 (25% in)
  • I see that I have made a trifling mistake, as you say; but by way of rewarding your honesty I give you another double Napoleon, that you may drink to my health, and be able to ask your messmates to join you.
    Chapters 25-26 (25% in)
  • The Bourbons left him quietly enough at the Catalans, but Napoleon returned, a special levy was made, and Fernand was compelled to join.
    Chapters 27-28 (37% in)
  • Fernand would have been court-martialed if Napoleon had remained on the throne, but his action was rewarded by the Bourbons.
    Chapters 27-28 (39% in)
  • He folded up the accusation quietly, and put it as quietly in his pocket; read the examination, and saw that the name of Noirtier was not mentioned in it; perused, too, the application dated 10th April, 1815, in which Morrel, by the deputy procureur's advice, exaggerated with the best intentions (for Napoleon was then on the throne) the services Dantes had rendered to the imperial cause—services which Villefort's certificates rendered indispensable.
    Chapters 27-28 (94% in)
  • This petition to Napoleon, kept back by Villefort, had become, under the second restoration, a terrible weapon against him in the hands of the king's attorney.
    Chapters 27-28 (95% in)
  • As for Franz, he remained at Florence, and after having passed a few days in exploring the paradise of the Cascine, and spending two or three evenings at the houses of the Florentine nobility, he took a fancy into his head (having already visited Corsica, the cradle of Bonaparte) to visit Elba, the waiting-place of Napoleon.
    Chapters 31-32 (2% in)
  • Yes, and at his age, Alexander, Caesar, and Napoleon, who have all made some noise in the world, were quite behind him.
    Chapters 33-34 (11% in)
  • "My dear fellow," replied Albert, with perfect ease of mind, "remember, for the future, Napoleon's maxim, 'Never awaken me but for bad news;' if you had let me sleep on, I should have finished my galop, and have been grateful to you all my life.
    Chapters 37-38 (56% in)
  • ...to a minister, plunged at once into European cabals and Parisian intrigues; having kings, and, better still, queens, to protect, parties to unite, elections to direct; making more use of your cabinet with your pen and your telegraph than Napoleon did of his battle-fields with his sword and his victories; possessing five and twenty thousand francs a year, besides your place; a horse, for which Chateau-Renaud offered you four hundred louis, and which you would not part with; a tailor...
    Chapters 39-40 (20% in)
  • I gave one to the Sultan, who mounted it in his sabre; another to our holy father the Pope, who had it set in his tiara, opposite to one nearly as large, though not so fine, given by the Emperor Napoleon to his predecessor, Pius VII.
    Chapters 39-40 (69% in)
  • "My father has been a Jacobin more than anything else," said Villefort, carried by his emotion beyond the bounds of prudence; "and the senator's robe, which Napoleon cast on his shoulders, only served to disguise the old man without in any degree changing him.
    Chapters 59-60 (66% in)
  • Although General d'Epinay served under Napoleon, did he not still retain royalist sentiments?
    Chapters 59-60 (68% in)
  • ...Duchampy, general of brigade, and Claude Lecharpal, keeper of woods and forests, Declare, that on the 4th of February, a letter arrived from the Island of Elba, recommending to the kindness and the confidence of the Bonapartist Club, General Flavien de Quesnel, who having served the emperor from 1804. to 1814 was supposed to be devoted to the interests of the Napoleon dynasty, notwithstanding the title of baron which Louis XVIII. had just granted to him with his estate of Epinay.
    Chapters 75-76 (11% in)

There are no more uses of "Napoleon Bonaparte" in The Count of Monte Cristo.

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