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proverb
used in The Count of Monte Cristo

12 uses
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Definition
a short saying — typically well-known and accepted by many as offering good advice
  • There is a wise Latin proverb that is very much in point.
    Chapters 5-6 (85% in)
  • "If I were sole owner we'd shake hands on it now, my dear Dantes, and call it settled; but I have a partner, and you know the Italian proverb—Chi ha compagno ha padrone—'He who has a partner has a master.'
    Chapters 1-2 (47% in)
  • He was not rich, although the wealth of his family had passed into a proverb, and I heard the phrase very often, 'As rich as a Spada.'
    Chapters 17-18 (73% in)
  • Born in the neighborhood of Arles, she had shared in the beauty for which its women are proverbial; but that beauty had gradually withered beneath the devastating influence of the slow fever so prevalent among dwellers by the ponds of Aiguemortes and the marshes of Camargue.
    Chapters 25-26 (43% in)
  • "Shall we make a positive appointment for a particular day and hour?" inquired the count; "only let me warn you that I am proverbial for my punctilious exactitude in keeping my engagements."
    Chapters 37-38 (79% in)
  • Unfortunately, there is a proverb which says that 'red is either altogether good or altogether bad.'
    Chapters 43-44 (60% in)
  • The proverb was but too correct as regarded Benedetto, and even in his infancy he manifested the worst disposition.
    Chapters 43-44 (61% in)
  • He reflected, smiled, and replied to me by a Sicilian proverb, which I believe is also a French proverb, 'My son, the world was not made in a day—but in seven.
    Chapters 51-52 (85% in)
  • He reflected, smiled, and replied to me by a Sicilian proverb, which I believe is also a French proverb, 'My son, the world was not made in a day—but in seven.
    Chapters 51-52 (85% in)
  • No one would have thought in looking at this old, weather-beaten, floral-decked tower (which might be likened to an elderly dame dressed up to receive her grandchildren at a birthday feast) that it would have been capable of telling strange things, if,—in addition to the menacing ears which the proverb says all walls are provided with,—it had also a voice.
    Chapters 61-62 (4% in)
  • " 'Never despair of anything,' says the proverb."
    Chapters 67-68 (95% in)
  • When I perceived you, I was just asking myself whether I had not wished harm towards those poor Morcerfs, which would have justified the proverb of 'He who wishes misfortunes to happen to others experiences them himself.'
    Chapters 103-104 (63% in)

There are no more uses of "proverb" in The Count of Monte Cristo.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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