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efface
used in The Count of Monte Cristo

8 uses
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1  —3 uses as in:
efface the memory
Definition
remove completely from recognition or memory — sometimes by erasing
  • "And one which will go far to efface the recollection of his father's conduct," added the incorrigible marquise.
    Chapters 5-6 (86% in)
efface = remove completely from recognition or memory
  • The strife had fairly begun, and the recollection of what they had seen half an hour before was gradually effaced from the young men's minds, so much were they occupied by the gay and glittering procession they now beheld.
    Chapters 35-36 (51% in)
  • effaced = removed completely from recognition or memory
  • "My dear count," said Albert, advancing to meet him, "permit me to repeat the poor thanks I offered last night, and to assure you that the remembrance of all I owe to you will never be effaced from my memory; believe me, as long as I live, I shall never cease to dwell with grateful recollection on the prompt and important service you rendered me; and also to remember that to you I am indebted even for my life."
    Chapters 37-38 (68% in)
effaced = removed completely from recognition or memory
There are no more uses of "efface" flagged with this meaning in The Count of Monte Cristo.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
?  —5 uses
exact meaning not specified
  • I will efface that blot on my father's character.
    Chapters 77-78 (83% in)
  • "Upon my word," said Caderousse, from whose mind the friendly treatment of Dantes, united with the effect of the excellent wine he had partaken of, had effaced every feeling of envy or jealousy at Dantes' good fortune,—"upon my word, Dantes is a downright good fellow, and when I see him sitting there beside his pretty wife that is so soon to be.
    Chapters 5-6 (23% in)
  • ...give it everywhere a uniform appearance; then, quitting the grotto, he replaced the stone, heaping on it broken masses of rocks and rough fragments of crumbling granite, filling the interstices with earth, into which he deftly inserted rapidly growing plants, such as the wild myrtle and flowering thorn, then carefully watering these new plantations, he scrupulously effaced every trace of footsteps, leaving the approach to the cavern as savage-looking and untrodden as he had found it.
    Chapters 25-26 (2% in)
  • With it was effaced the last trace of the preceding night; and then supper, Sinbad, hashish, statues,—all became a dream for Franz.
    Chapters 31-32 (93% in)
  • This done, instead of leaving the door fastened, he drew back the bolts and even placed the door ajar, as though he had left the room, forgetting to close it, and slipping into the chimney like a man accustomed to that kind of gymnastic exercise, having effaced the marks of his feet upon the floor, he commenced climbing the only opening which afforded him the means of escape.
    Chapters 97-98 (73% in)

There are no more uses of "efface" in The Count of Monte Cristo.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®