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capricious
used in Nicholas Nickleby

3 uses
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Definition
impulsive or unpredictable or tending to make sudden changes — especially impulsive behavior
  • If any caprice of temper should induce him to cast aside this golden opportunity before he has brought it to perfection, I consider myself absolved from extending any assistance to his mother and sister.
    Chapter 4 (79% in)
caprice = impulsiveness
  • The consequence was, that Kate had the double mortification of being an indispensable part of the circle when Sir Mulberry and his friends were there, and of being exposed, on that very account, to all Mrs Wititterly's ill-humours and caprices when they were gone.
    Chapter 28 (51% in)
  • That for two long years, toiling by day and often too by night, working at the needle, the pencil, and the pen, and submitting, as a daily governess, to such caprices and indignities as women (with daughters too) too often love to inflict upon their own sex when they serve in such capacities, as though in jealousy of the superior intelligence which they are necessitated to employ,—indignities, in ninety-nine cases out of every hundred, heaped upon persons immeasurably and incalculably...
    Chapter 46 (35% in)

There are no more uses of "capricious" in Nicholas Nickleby.

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