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cordial
used in Anna Karenina

12 uses
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Definition
friendly — usually warm and heartfelt, but possibly only polite
  • Anna Pavlovna had met Kitty with affected cordiality, and had kept continual watch on her and on her husband.
    Part Two (92% in)
  • Vronsky got up and, looking cordially at Levin, shook hands with him.
    Part One (44% in)
  • Levin certainly was out of humor, and in spite of all his desire to be affectionate and cordial to his charming visitor, he could not control his mood.
    Part Two (44% in)
  • "At first things were rather uncomfortable, but now we've settled everything capitally— thanks to my old nurse," she said, indicating Marya Philimonovna, who, seeing that they were speaking of her, smiled brightly and cordially to Levin.
    Part Three (26% in)
  • On meeting Anna Karenina, as he was Alexey Alexandrovitch's enemy in the government, he tried, like a shrewd man and a man of the world, to be particularly cordial with her, the wife of his enemy.
    Part Three (55% in)
  • Vronsky was more than cordial with him, and was obviously interested to know the artist's opinion of his picture.
    Part Five (36% in)
  • While he was writing his ideas she was thinking how unnaturally cordial her husband had been to young Prince Tcharsky, who had, with great want of tact, flirted with her the day before they left Moscow.
    Part Five (42% in)
  • But you don't care for life abroad," she said with a cordial smile.
    Part Five (92% in)
  • Serpuhovskoy had long given up all hope of Vronsky's career, but he liked him as before, and was now particularly cordial to him.
    Part Five (97% in)
  • Even Sergey Ivanovitch, who had come out too onto the steps, seemed to him unpleasant with the show of cordiality with which he met Stepan Arkadyevitch, though Levin knew that his brother neither liked nor respected Oblonsky.
    Part Six (16% in)
  • Princess Varvara gave Dolly a cordial and rather patronizing reception, and began at once explaining to her that she was living with Anna because she had always cared more for her than her sister Katerina Pavlovna, the aunt that had brought Anna up, and that now, when every one had abandoned Anna, she thought it her duty to help her in this most difficult period of transition.
    Part Six (59% in)
  • ...far from stylish, but respectful footmen, unmistakably old house serfs who had stuck to their master; the stout, good-natured wife in a cap with lace and a Turkish shawl, petting her pretty grandchild, her daughter's daughter; the young son, a sixth form high school boy, coming home from school, and greeting his father, kissing his big hand; the genuine, cordial words and gestures of the old man—all this had the day before roused an instinctive feeling of respect and sympathy in Levin.
    Part Six (87% in)

There are no more uses of "cordial" in Anna Karenina.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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