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collide
used in War and Peace

12 uses
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Definition
crash together with violent impact; or come into conflict
  • The last of the Horse Guards, a huge pockmarked fellow, frowned angrily on seeing Rostov before him, with whom he would inevitably collide.
    Book Three — 1805 (88% in)
  • He had a science—the theory of oblique movements deduced by him from the history of Frederick the Great's wars, and all he came across in the history of more recent warfare seemed to him absurd and barbarous—monstrous collisions in which so many blunders were committed by both sides that these wars could not be called wars, they did not accord with the theory, and therefore could not serve as material for science.
    Book Nine — 1812 (46% in)
  • Beyond that space there was, on the one side, a demonstration made by the Russians with Uvarov's cavalry at midday, and on the other side, beyond Utitsa, Poniatowski's collision with Tuchkov; but these two were detached and feeble actions in comparison with what took place in the center of the battlefield.
    Book Ten — 1812 (85% in)
  • There for several hours amid incessant cannon and musketry fire, now Russians were seen alone, now Frenchmen alone, now infantry, and now cavalry: they appeared, fired, fell, collided, not knowing what to do with one another, screamed, and ran back again.
    Book Ten — 1812 (85% in)
  • The Russian army and people avoided a collision till Smolensk was reached, and again from Smolensk to Borodino.
    Book Eleven — 1812 (3% in)
  • At Borodino a collision took place.
    Book Eleven — 1812 (3% in)
  • Neither army was broken up, but the Russian army retreated immediately after the collision as inevitably as a ball recoils after colliding with another having a greater momentum, and with equal inevitability the ball of invasion that had advanced with such momentum rolled on for some distance, though the collision had deprived it of all its force.
    Book Eleven — 1812 (3% in)
  • Neither army was broken up, but the Russian army retreated immediately after the collision as inevitably as a ball recoils after colliding with another having a greater momentum, and with equal inevitability the ball of invasion that had advanced with such momentum rolled on for some distance, though the collision had deprived it of all its force.
    Book Eleven — 1812 (3% in)
  • Neither army was broken up, but the Russian army retreated immediately after the collision as inevitably as a ball recoils after colliding with another having a greater momentum, and with equal inevitability the ball of invasion that had advanced with such momentum rolled on for some distance, though the collision had deprived it of all its force.
    Book Eleven — 1812 (3% in)
  • On the bridge he collided with a Cossack who had fallen behind, but he galloped on.
    Book Fourteen — 1812 (60% in)
  • For the peoples of the west to be able to make their warlike movement to Moscow it was necessary: (1) that they should form themselves into a military group of a size able to endure a collision with the warlike military group of the east, (2) that they should abandon all established traditions and customs, and (3) that during their military movement they should have at their head a man who could justify to himself and to them the deceptions, robberies, and murders which would have to...
    Book Fifteen — 1812-13 (40% in)
  • Several times it moves eastward and collides with a countermovement from the east westward.
    Book Fifteen — 1812-13 (74% in)

There are no more uses of "collide" in War and Peace.

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