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capitulate
used in War and Peace

6 uses
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Definition
to stop resisting something — such as surrendering to someone else's decision or accepting a military defeat
  • "Well, is it true that it's peace and capitulation?" asked Nesvitski.
    Book Two — 1805 (61% in)
  • What about capitulation?
    Book Two — 1805 (63% in)
  • Wintzingerode was not merely to agree to the truce but also to offer terms of capitulation, and meanwhile Kutuzov sent his adjutants back to hasten to the utmost the movements of the baggage trains of the entire army along the Krems-Znaim road.
    Book Two — 1805 (66% in)
  • Kutuzov's expectations that the proposals of capitulation (which were in no way binding) might give time for part of the transport to pass, and also that Murat's mistake would very soon be discovered, proved correct.
    Book Two — 1805 (66% in)
  • As soon as Bonaparte (who was at Schonbrunn, sixteen miles from Hollabrunn) received Murat's dispatch with the proposal of a truce and a capitulation, he detected a ruse and wrote the following letter to Murat: Schonbrunn, 25th Brumaire, 1805, at eight o'clock in the morning To PRINCE MURAT, I cannot find words to express to you my displeasure.
    Book Two — 1805 (66% in)
  • Inform him that the general who signed that capitulation had no right to do so, and that no one but the Emperor of Russia has that right.
    Book Two — 1805 (66% in)

There are no more uses of "capitulate" in War and Peace.

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