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diversion
used in Gulliver's Travels

17 uses
  • The diversions of the court of Lilliput described.
    Part 1 — A Voyage to Lilliput (32% in)
  • This diversion is only practised by those persons who are candidates for great employments, and high favour at court.
    Part 1 — A Voyage to Lilliput (33% in)
  • These diversions are often attended with fatal accidents, whereof great numbers are on record.
    Part 1 — A Voyage to Lilliput (34% in)
  • There is likewise another diversion, which is only shown before the emperor and empress, and first minister, upon particular occasions.
    Part 1 — A Voyage to Lilliput (34% in)
  • They are bred up in the principles of honour, justice, courage, modesty, clemency, religion, and love of their country; they are always employed in some business, except in the times of eating and sleeping, which are very short, and two hours for diversions consisting of bodily exercises.
    Part 1 — A Voyage to Lilliput (70% in)
  • They are never suffered to converse with servants, but go together in smaller or greater numbers to take their diversions, and always in the presence of a professor, or one of his deputies; whereby they avoid those early bad impressions of folly and vice, to which our children are subject.
    Part 1 — A Voyage to Lilliput (70% in)
  • While he was thus reasoning and resolving with himself, a sardral, or gentleman-usher, came from court, commanding my master to carry me immediately thither for the diversion of the queen and her ladies.
    Part 2 — A Voyage to Brobdingnag (27% in)
  • Her majesty used to put a bit of meat upon one of my dishes, out of which I carved for myself, and her diversion was to see me eat in miniature: for the queen (who had indeed but a weak stomach) took up, at one mouthful, as much as a dozen English farmers could eat at a meal, which to me was for some time a very nauseous sight.
    Part 2 — A Voyage to Brobdingnag (34% in)
  • Here I often used to row for my own diversion, as well as that of the queen and her ladies, who thought themselves well entertained with my skill and agility.
    Part 2 — A Voyage to Brobdingnag (55% in)
  • In these diversions he was interrupted by a noise at the closet door, as if somebody were opening it: whereupon he suddenly leaped up to the window at which he had come in, and thence upon the leads and gutters, walking upon three legs, and holding me in the fourth, till he clambered up to a roof that was next to ours.
    Part 2 — A Voyage to Brobdingnag (58% in)
  • He observed, "that among the diversions of our nobility and gentry, I had mentioned gaming: he desired to know at what age this entertainment was usually taken up, and when it was laid down; how much of their time it employed; whether it ever went so high as to affect their fortunes; whether mean, vicious people, by their dexterity in that art, might not arrive at great riches, and sometimes keep our very nobles in dependence, as well as habituate them to vile companions, wholly take...
    Part 2 — A Voyage to Brobdingnag (72% in)
  • My answer was, "that we were overstocked with books of travels: that nothing could now pass which was not extraordinary; wherein I doubted some authors less consulted truth, than their own vanity, or interest, or the diversion of ignorant readers; that my story could contain little beside common events, without those ornamental descriptions of strange plants, trees, birds, and other animals; or of the barbarous customs and idolatry of savage people, with which most writers abound.
    Part 2 — A Voyage to Brobdingnag (96% in)
  • ...to the island, although I think it the most delicious spot of ground in the world; and although they live here in the greatest plenty and magnificence, and are allowed to do whatever they please, they long to see the world, and take the diversions of the metropolis, which they are not allowed to do without a particular license from the king; and this is not easy to be obtained, because the people of quality have found, by frequent experience, how hard it is to persuade their women to...
    Part 3 — A Voyage to Laputa, Balnibarbi, .... (21% in)
  • The sum of his discourse was to this effect: "That about forty years ago, certain persons went up to Laputa, either upon business or diversion, and, after five months continuance, came back with a very little smattering in mathematics, but full of volatile spirits acquired in that airy region: that these persons, upon their return, began to dislike the management of every thing below, and fell into schemes of putting all arts, sciences, languages, and mechanics, upon a new foot.
    Part 3 — A Voyage to Laputa, Balnibarbi, .... (37% in)
  • I would exactly set down the several changes in customs, language, fashions of dress, diet, and diversions.
    Part 3 — A Voyage to Laputa, Balnibarbi, .... (86% in)
  • And to set forth the valour of my own dear countrymen, I assured him, "that I had seen them blow up a hundred enemies at once in a siege, and as many in a ship, and beheld the dead bodies drop down in pieces from the clouds, to the great diversion of the spectators."
    Part 4 — A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (35% in)
  • This was a matter of diversion to my master and his family, as well as of mortification to myself.
    Part 4 — A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (60% in)

There are no more uses of "diversion" in Gulliver's Travels.

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