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discourse
used in Gulliver's Travels

36 uses
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Definition
a serious speech, writing, or conversation on a particular topic
  • This was my sincere endeavour in those many discourses I had with that monarch,
    Part 2 -- A Voyage to Brobdingnag (75% in)
discourses = conversations
  • Likewise in the account of the academy of projectors, and several passages of my discourse to my master Houyhnhnm, you have either omitted some material circumstances, or minced or changed them in such a manner, that I do hardly know my own work.
    Introductory Sections (37% in)
  • On the other side, discoursing of the ladies in that emperor's court, he used to tell me, "one had freckles; another too wide a mouth; a third too large a nose;" nothing of which I was able to distinguish.
    Part 2 -- A Voyage to Brobdingnag (15% in)
  • He desired "I would give him as exact an account of the government of England as I possibly could; because, as fond as princes commonly are of their own customs (for so he conjectured of other monarchs, by my former discourses), he should be glad to hear of any thing that might deserve imitation."
    Part 2 -- A Voyage to Brobdingnag (66% in)
  • I began my discourse by informing his majesty, that our dominions consisted of two islands, which composed three mighty kingdoms, under one sovereign, beside our plantations in America.
    Part 2 -- A Voyage to Brobdingnag (66% in)
  • For, I remember very well, in a discourse one day with the king, when I happened to say, "there were several thousand books among us written upon the art of government," it gave him (directly contrary to my intention) a very mean opinion of our understandings.
    Part 2 -- A Voyage to Brobdingnag (78% in)
  • To which he answered, that discoursing this matter with the sailors while I was asleep, one of them said, he had observed three eagles flying towards the north, but remarked nothing of their being larger than the usual size:" which I suppose must be imputed to the great height they were at; and he could not guess the reason of my question.
    Part 2 -- A Voyage to Brobdingnag (93% in)
  • It seems the minds of these people are so taken up with intense speculations, that they neither can speak, nor attend to the discourses of others, without being roused by some external taction upon the organs of speech and hearing; for which reason, those persons who are able to afford it always keep a flapper (the original is climenole) in their family, as one of their domestics; nor ever walk abroad, or make visits, without him.
    Part 3 -- A Voyage to Laputa, Balnibarbi, . (10% in)
  • The sum of his discourse was to this effect: "That about forty years ago, certain persons went up to Laputa, either upon business or diversion, and, after five months continuance, came back with a very little smattering in mathematics, but full of volatile spirits acquired in that airy region: that these persons, upon their return, began to dislike the management of every thing below, and fell into schemes of putting all arts, sciences, languages, and mechanics, upon a new foot.
    Part 3 -- A Voyage to Laputa, Balnibarbi, . (37% in)
  • The first project was, to shorten discourse, by cutting polysyllables into one, and leaving out verbs and participles, because, in reality, all things imaginable are but norms.
    Part 3 -- A Voyage to Laputa, Balnibarbi, . (49% in)
  • An expedient was therefore offered, "that since words are only names for things, it would be more convenient for all men to carry about them such things as were necessary to express a particular business they are to discourse on."
    Part 3 -- A Voyage to Laputa, Balnibarbi, . (49% in)
  • The whole discourse was written with great acuteness, containing many observations, both curious and useful for politicians; but, as I conceived, not altogether complete.
    Part 3 -- A Voyage to Laputa, Balnibarbi, . (58% in)
  • Here I discovered the roguery and ignorance of those who pretend to write anecdotes, or secret history; who send so many kings to their graves with a cup of poison; will repeat the discourse between a prince and chief minister, where no witness was by; unlock the thoughts and cabinets of ambassadors and secretaries of state; and have the perpetual misfortune to be mistaken.
    Part 3 -- A Voyage to Laputa, Balnibarbi, . (71% in)
  • The gentleman to whom I addressed my discourse, because (as I have already observed) he spoke the language of Balnibarbi, said to me, with a sort of a smile which usually arises from pity to the ignorant, "that he was glad of any occasion to keep me among them, and desired my permission to explain to the company what I had spoke."
    Part 3 -- A Voyage to Laputa, Balnibarbi, . (84% in)
  • He did so, and they talked together for some time in their own language, whereof I understood not a syllable, neither could I observe by their countenances, what impression my discourse had made on them.
    Part 3 -- A Voyage to Laputa, Balnibarbi, . (85% in)
  • When I had ended, and the sum of my discourse had been interpreted, as before, to the rest of the company, there was a good deal of talk among them in the language of the country, not without some laughter at my expense.
    Part 3 -- A Voyage to Laputa, Balnibarbi, . (88% in)
  • This thought gave me so much comfort, that I resolved to go forward, until I could discover some house or village, or meet with any of the natives, leaving the two horses to discourse together as they pleased.
    Part 4 -- A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (6% in)
  • After some further discourse, which I then conjectured might relate to me, the two friends took their leaves, with the same compliment of striking each other's hoof; and the gray made me signs that I should walk before him; wherein I thought it prudent to comply, till I could find a better director.
    Part 4 -- A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (9% in)
  • The gray ordered me to stand by him; and much discourse passed between him and his friend concerning me, as I found by the stranger's often looking on me, and the frequent repetition of the word Yahoo.
    Part 4 -- A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (14% in)
  • He said, "my discourse was all very strange, but especially the last part; for he could not understand, why nature should teach us to conceal what nature had given; that neither himself nor family were ashamed of any parts of their bodies; but, however, I might do as I pleased."
    Part 4 -- A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (21% in)
  • The author's discourse disapproved by his master.
    Part 4 -- A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (24% in)
  • And I remember, in frequent discourses with my master concerning the nature of manhood in other parts of the world, having occasion to talk of lying and false representation, it was with much difficulty that he comprehended what I meant, although he had otherwise a most acute judgment.
    Part 4 -- A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (24% in)
  • During this discourse, my master was pleased to interrupt me several times.
    Part 4 -- A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (30% in)
  • ] The reader may please to observe, that the following extract of many conversations I had with my master, contains a summary of the most material points which were discoursed at several times for above two years; his honour often desiring fuller satisfaction, as I farther improved in the Houyhnhnm tongue.
    Part 4 -- A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (31% in)
  • I laid before him, as well as I could, the whole state of Europe; I discoursed of trade and manufactures, of arts and sciences; and the answers I gave to all the questions he made, as they arose upon several subjects, were a fund of conversation not to be exhausted.
    Part 4 -- A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (31% in)
  • But as my discourse had increased his abhorrence of the whole species, so he found it gave him a disturbance in his mind to which he was wholly a stranger before.
    Part 4 -- A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (35% in)
  • He added, "that he had heard too much upon the subject of war, both in this and some former discourses.
    Part 4 -- A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (35% in)
  • In answer to which I assured his honour, "that in all points out of their own trade, they were usually the most ignorant and stupid generation among us, the most despicable in common conversation, avowed enemies to all knowledge and learning, and equally disposed to pervert the general reason of mankind in every other subject of discourse as in that of their own profession."
    Part 4 -- A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (39% in)
  • I had formerly, upon occasion, discoursed with my master upon the nature of government in general, and particularly of our own excellent constitution, deservedly the wonder and envy of the whole world.
    Part 4 -- A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (44% in)
  • One day, in discourse, my master, having heard me mention the nobility of my country, was pleased to make me a compliment which I could not pretend to deserve: "that he was sure I must have been born of some noble family, because I far exceeded in shape, colour, and cleanliness, all the Yahoos of his nation, although I seemed to fail in strength and agility, which must be imputed to my different way of living from those other brutes; and besides I was not only endowed with the faculty...
    Part 4 -- A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (46% in)
  • My master, continuing his discourse, said, "there was nothing that rendered the Yahoos more odious, than their undistinguishing appetite to devour every thing that came in their way, whether herbs, roots, berries, the corrupted flesh of animals, or all mingled together: and it was peculiar in their temper, that they were fonder of what they could get by rapine or stealth, at a greater distance, than much better food provided for them at home.
    Part 4 -- A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (53% in)
  • I had the favour of being admitted to several Houyhnhnms, who came to visit or dine with my master; where his honour graciously suffered me to wait in the room, and listen to their discourse.
    Part 4 -- A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (74% in)
  • They have a notion, that when people are met together, a short silence does much improve conversation: this I found to be true; for during those little intermissions of talk, new ideas would arise in their minds, which very much enlivened the discourse.
    Part 4 -- A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (74% in)
  • I may add, without vanity, that my presence often gave them sufficient matter for discourse, because it afforded my master an occasion of letting his friends into the history of me and my country, upon which they were all pleased to descant, in a manner not very advantageous to humankind: and for that reason I shall not repeat what they said; only I may be allowed to observe, that his honour, to my great admiration, appeared to understand the nature of Yahoos much better than myself.
    Part 4 -- A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (74% in)
  • I freely confess, that all the little knowledge I have of any value, was acquired by the lectures I received from my master, and from hearing the discourses of him and his friends; to which I should be prouder to listen, than to dictate to the greatest and wisest assembly in Europe.
    Part 4 -- A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (75% in)
  • I was struck with the utmost grief and despair at my master's discourse; and being unable to support the agonies I was under, I fell into a swoon at his feet.
    Part 4 -- A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (78% in)

There are no more uses of "discourse" in Gulliver's Travels.

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