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piquant
used in Middlemarch

2 uses
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Definition
having an agreeably pungent or spicy taste

or:

engagingly stimulating or provocative
  • He had quitted the party early, and would have thought it altogether tedious but for the novelty of certain introductions, especially the introduction to Miss Brooke, whose youthful bloom, with her approaching marriage to that faded scholar, and her interest in matters socially useful, gave her the piquancy of an unusual combination.
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (76% in)
  • In Rosamond's romance it was not necessary to imagine much about the inward life of the hero, or of his serious business in the world: of course, he had a profession and was clever, as well as sufficiently handsome; but the piquant fact about Lydgate was his good birth, which distinguished him from all Middlemarch admirers, and presented marriage as a prospect of rising in rank and getting a little nearer to that celestial condition on earth in which she would have nothing to do with...
    Book 2 — Old and Young (43% in)

There are no more uses of "piquant" in Middlemarch.

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