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recoil
used in Middlemarch

5 uses
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Definition
to move backward suddenly (sometimes figuratively)
especially:
  • the backward jerk of a gun or cannon when it is fired
  • when a person flinches (suddenly draws back) from someone or something, as with fear, disgust, or pain
  • when a person is emotionally repulsed, as by disgust
  • when something intended to go in one direction figuratively falls back in the opposite direction; for example, a story told to hurt someone that comes back to hurt the teller
  • He reflected, with much probability on his side, that Lydgate would by-and-by be caught tripping too, and that his ungentlemanly attempts to discredit the sale of drugs by his professional brethren, would by-and-by recoil on himself.
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (38% in)
  • In vain he said to himself that, if permitted, it would be a divine visitation, a chastisement, a preparation; he recoiled from the imagined burning; and he judged that it must be more for the Divine glory that he should escape dishonor.
    Book 7 — Two Temptations (54% in)
  • That recoil had at last urged him to make preparations for quitting Middlemarch.
    Book 7 — Two Temptations (54% in)
  • She had no sense of chill resolute repulsion, of reticent self-justification such as she had known under Lydgate's most stormy displeasure: all her sensibility was turned into a bewildering novelty of pain; she felt a new terrified recoil under a lash never experienced before.
    Book 8 — Sunset and Sunrise (48% in)
  • Some time, perhaps—when he was dying—he would tell her all: in the deep shadow of that time, when she held his hand in the gathering darkness, she might listen without recoiling from his touch.
    Book 8 — Sunset and Sunrise (94% in)

There are no more uses of "recoil" in Middlemarch.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®Wikipedia - Recoil (gun)