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disdain
used in Middlemarch

4 uses
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Definition
a lack of respect — often suggesting distaste and an undeserved sense of superiority

or:

to reject as not good enough
  • Among our valued friends is there not some one or other who is a little too self-confident and disdainful;
    Book 2 — Old and Young (26% in)
disdainful = lacking respect for others with an undeserved sense of superiority
  • She had a good deal of disdain for Mrs. Vincy's evident alarm lest she and Fred should be alone together, but it did not hinder her from thinking anxiously of the way in which Fred would be affected, if it should turn out that his uncle had left him as poor as ever.
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (95% in)
  • Fred wrote the lines demanded in a hand as gentlemanly as that of any viscount or bishop of the day: the vowels were all alike and the consonants only distinguishable as turning up or down, the strokes had a blotted solidity and the letters disdained to keep the line—in short, it was a manuscript of that venerable kind easy to interpret when you know beforehand what the writer means.
    Book 6 — The Widow and Wife (30% in)
  • "I cannot conceive why you should speak of your cousin so contemptuously," said Rosamond, her fingers moving at her work while she spoke with a mild gravity which had a touch of disdain in it.
    Book 6 — The Widow and Wife (46% in)

There are no more uses of "disdain" in Middlemarch.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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