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chronic
used in Middlemarch

3 uses
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Definition
of something bad:  long-lasting or happening all the time — especially of disease
  • He was not saying angrily within himself that he had made a profound mistake; but the mistake was at work in him like a recognized chronic disease, mingling its uneasy importunities with every prospect, and enfeebling every thought.
    Book 6 — The Widow and Wife (55% in)
  • Patients who had chronic diseases or whose lives had long been worn threadbare, like old Featherstone's, had been at once inclined to try him; also, many who did not like paying their doctor's bills, thought agreeably of opening an account with a new doctor and sending for him without stint if the children's temper wanted a dose, occasions when the old practitioners were often crusty; and all persons thus inclined to employ Lydgate held it likely that he was clever.
    Book 5 — The Dead Hand (12% in)
  • Raffles proved more unmanageable than he had shown himself to be in his former appearances, his chronic state of mental restlessness, the growing effect of habitual intemperance, quickly shaking off every impression from what was said to him.
    Book 7 — Two Temptations (50% in)

There are no more uses of "chronic" in Middlemarch.

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