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statutory law
used in The Comedy of Errors

3 uses
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Definition
law developed by governmental groups in contrast to common law (based on custom and precedent) — this is also one of the senses of the term, civil law
  • This very day a Syracusian merchant Is apprehended for arrival here; And, not being able to buy out his life, According to the statute of the town, Dies ere the weary sun set in the west.
    1.2 — Act 1 Scene 2 — A public place (6% in)
  • Merchant of Syracuse, plead no more; I am not partial to infringe our laws: The enmity and discord which of late Sprung from the rancorous outrage of your duke To merchants, our well-dealing countrymen,— Who, wanting guilders to redeem their lives, Have seal'd his rigorous statutes with their bloods,— Excludes all pity from our threat'ning looks.
    1.1 — Act 1 Scene 1 — A hall in the DUKE'S palace (8% in)
  • To see a reverend Syracusian merchant, Who put unluckily into this bay Against the laws and statutes of this town, Beheaded publicly for his offence.
    5.1 — Act 5 Scene 1 — The same (29% in)

There are no more uses of "statutory law" in The Comedy of Errors.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®Wikipedia Article