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cease
used in Sense and Sensibility

23 uses
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Definition
to stop or discontinue
  • With such a reward for her tears, the child was too wise to cease crying.
    Chapter 21 (44% in)
  • CHAPTER 3 Mrs. Dashwood remained at Norland several months; not from any disinclination to move when the sight of every well known spot ceased to raise the violent emotion which it produced for a while; for when her spirits began to revive, and her mind became capable of some other exertion than that of heightening its affliction by melancholy remembrances, she was impatient to be gone, and indefatigable in her inquiries for a suitable dwelling in the neighbourhood of Norland; for to...
    Chapter 3 (2% in)
  • "Dear, dear Norland!" said Marianne, as she wandered alone before the house, on the last evening of their being there; "when shall I cease to regret you!
    Chapter 5 (90% in)
  • To enquire after Marianne was at first his excuse; but the encouragement of his reception, to which every day gave greater kindness, made such an excuse unnecessary before it had ceased to be possible, by Marianne's perfect recovery.
    Chapter 10 (39% in)
  • Colonel Brandon's partiality for Marianne, which had so early been discovered by his friends, now first became perceptible to Elinor, when it ceased to be noticed by them.
    Chapter 10 (58% in)
  • She would have been glad to know when these difficulties were to cease, this opposition was to yield,—when Mrs. Ferrars would be reformed, and her son be at liberty to be happy.
    Chapter 19 (14% in)
  • Mrs. Jennings, in the meantime, talked on as loud as she could, and continued her account of their surprise, the evening before, on seeing their friends, without ceasing till every thing was told.
    Chapter 19 (77% in)
  • With her children they were in continual raptures, extolling their beauty, courting their notice, and humouring their whims; and such of their time as could be spared from the importunate demands which this politeness made on it, was spent in admiration of whatever her ladyship was doing, if she happened to be doing any thing, or in taking patterns of some elegant new dress, in which her appearance the day before had thrown them into unceasing delight.
    Chapter 21 (31% in)
  • The necessity of concealing from her mother and Marianne, what had been entrusted in confidence to herself, though it obliged her to unceasing exertion, was no aggravation of Elinor's distress.
    Chapter 23 (34% in)
  • He listened to her with silent attention, and on her ceasing to speak, rose directly from his seat, and after saying in a voice of emotion, "to your sister I wish all imaginable happiness; to Willoughby that he may endeavour to deserve her,"—took leave, and went away.
    Chapter 27 (96% in)
  • The good understanding between the Colonel and Miss Dashwood seemed rather to declare that the honours of the mulberry-tree, the canal, and the yew arbour, would all be made over to HER; and Mrs. Jennings had, for some time ceased to think at all of Mrs. Ferrars.
    Chapter 32 (66% in)
  • When that was once done, however, it was time for the raptures of Edward to cease; for Marianne's joy hurried her into the drawing-room immediately.
    Chapter 35 (59% in)
  • Here Mrs. Jennings ceased, and as Elinor had had time enough to collect her thoughts, she was able to give such an answer, and make such observations, as the subject might naturally be supposed to produce.
    Chapter 37 (25% in)
  • Happy to find that she was not suspected of any extraordinary interest in it; that Mrs. Jennings (as she had of late often hoped might be the case) had ceased to imagine her at all attached to Edward; and happy above all the rest, in the absence of Marianne, she felt very well able to speak of the affair without embarrassment, and to give her judgment, as she believed, with impartiality on the conduct of every one concerned in it.
    Chapter 37 (27% in)
  • For a short time he sat deep in thought, after Elinor had ceased to speak;—at last, and as if it were rather an effort, he said, "Colonel Brandon seems a man of great worth and respectability.
    Chapter 40 (67% in)
  • Elinor did not offer to detain him; and they parted, with a very earnest assurance on HER side of her unceasing good wishes for his happiness in every change of situation that might befall him; on HIS, with rather an attempt to return the same good will, than the power of expressing it.
    Chapter 40 (76% in)
  • The kindness, the unceasing kindness of Mrs. Jennings, I had repaid with ungrateful contempt.
    Chapter 46 (74% in)
  • Here ceased the rapid flow of her self-reproving spirit; and Elinor, impatient to soothe, though too honest to flatter, gave her instantly that praise and support which her frankness and her contrition so well deserved.
    Chapter 46 (81% in)
  • When Elinor had ceased to rejoice in the dryness of the season, a very awful pause took place.
    Chapter 48 (68% in)
  • She almost ran out of the room, and as soon as the door was closed, burst into tears of joy, which at first she thought would never cease.
    Chapter 48 (92% in)
  • He was released without any reproach to himself, from an entanglement which had long formed his misery, from a woman whom he had long ceased to love;— and elevated at once to that security with another, which he must have thought of almost with despair, as soon as he had learnt to consider it with desire.
    Chapter 49 (7% in)
  • Lucy's marriage, the unceasing and reasonable wonder among them all, formed of course one of the earliest discussions of the lovers;—and Elinor's particular knowledge of each party made it appear to her in every view, as one of the most extraordinary and unaccountable circumstances she had ever heard.
    Chapter 49 (26% in)
  • The whole of Lucy's behaviour in the affair, and the prosperity which crowned it, therefore, may be held forth as a most encouraging instance of what an earnest, an unceasing attention to self-interest, however its progress may be apparently obstructed, will do in securing every advantage of fortune, with no other sacrifice than that of time and conscience.
    Chapter 50 (41% in)

There are no more uses of "cease" in Sense and Sensibility.

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