toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Go to Book

elegant
used in Sense and Sensibility

29 uses
  • The merest awkward country girl, without style, or elegance, and almost without beauty.
    Chapter 41 (88% in)
  • "— "He would certainly have done more justice to simple and elegant prose.
    Chapter 3 (90% in)
  • With the size and furniture of the house Mrs. Dashwood was upon the whole well satisfied; for though her former style of life rendered many additions to the latter indispensable, yet to add and improve was a delight to her; and she had at this time ready money enough to supply all that was wanted of greater elegance to the apartments.
    Chapter 6 (34% in)
  • They were, of course, very anxious to see a person on whom so much of their comfort at Barton must depend; and the elegance of her appearance was favourable to their wishes.
    Chapter 6 (78% in)
  • Her manners had all the elegance which her husband's wanted.
    Chapter 6 (80% in)
  • The house was large and handsome; and the Middletons lived in a style of equal hospitality and elegance.
    Chapter 7 (4% in)
  • Lady Middleton piqued herself upon the elegance of her table, and of all her domestic arrangements; and from this kind of vanity was her greatest enjoyment in any of their parties.
    Chapter 7 (19% in)
  • Had he been even old, ugly, and vulgar, the gratitude and kindness of Mrs. Dashwood would have been secured by any act of attention to her child; but the influence of youth, beauty, and elegance, gave an interest to the action which came home to her feelings.
    Chapter 9 (47% in)
  • "Did he indeed?" cried Marianne with sparkling eyes, "and with elegance, with spirit?"
    Chapter 9 (89% in)
  • CHAPTER 10 Marianne's preserver, as Margaret, with more elegance than precision, styled Willoughby, called at the cottage early the next morning to make his personal enquiries.
    Chapter 10 (0% in)
  • He was received by Mrs. Dashwood with more than politeness; with a kindness which Sir John's account of him and her own gratitude prompted; and every thing that passed during the visit tended to assure him of the sense, elegance, mutual affection, and domestic comfort of the family to whom accident had now introduced him.
    Chapter 10 (3% in)
  • "Well, then, he is lately dead, Marianne, for I am sure there was such a man once, and his name begins with an F." Most grateful did Elinor feel to Lady Middleton for observing, at this moment, "that it rained very hard," though she believed the interruption to proceed less from any attention to her, than from her ladyship's great dislike of all such inelegant subjects of raillery as delighted her husband and mother.
    Chapter 12 (83% in)
  • Every body pretends to feel and tries to describe with the taste and elegance of him who first defined what picturesque beauty was.
    Chapter 18 (37% in)
  • Her manners were by no means so elegant as her sister's, but they were much more prepossessing.
    Chapter 19 (67% in)
  • Their engagements at Exeter instantly gave way before such an invitation, and Lady Middleton was thrown into no little alarm on the return of Sir John, by hearing that she was very soon to receive a visit from two girls whom she had never seen in her life, and of whose elegance,— whose tolerable gentility even, she could have no proof; for the assurances of her husband and mother on that subject went for nothing at all.
    Chapter 21 (7% in)
  • ...promised visit to the Park and consequent introduction to these young ladies took place, they found in the appearance of the eldest, who was nearly thirty, with a very plain and not a sensible face, nothing to admire; but in the other, who was not more than two or three and twenty, they acknowledged considerable beauty; her features were pretty, and she had a sharp quick eye, and a smartness of air, which though it did not give actual elegance or grace, gave distinction to her person.
    Chapter 21 (27% in)
  • With her children they were in continual raptures, extolling their beauty, courting their notice, and humouring their whims; and such of their time as could be spared from the importunate demands which this politeness made on it, was spent in admiration of whatever her ladyship was doing, if she happened to be doing any thing, or in taking patterns of some elegant new dress, in which her appearance the day before had thrown them into unceasing delight.
    Chapter 21 (30% in)
  • The vulgar freedom and folly of the eldest left her no recommendation, and as Elinor was not blinded by the beauty, or the shrewd look of the youngest, to her want of real elegance and artlessness, she left the house without any wish of knowing them better.
    Chapter 21 (75% in)
  • —They came from Exeter, well provided with admiration for the use of Sir John Middleton, his family, and all his relations, and no niggardly proportion was now dealt out to his fair cousins, whom they declared to be the most beautiful, elegant, accomplished, and agreeable girls they had ever beheld, and with whom they were particularly anxious to be better acquainted.
    Chapter 21 (77% in)
  • Since the death of her husband, who had traded with success in a less elegant part of the town, she had resided every winter in a house in one of the streets near Portman Square.
    Chapter 25 (2% in)
  • In the country, an unpremeditated dance was very allowable; but in London, where the reputation of elegance was more important and less easily attained, it was risking too much for the gratification of a few girls, to have it known that Lady Middleton had given a small dance of eight or nine couple, with two violins, and a mere side-board collation.
    Chapter 27 (50% in)
  • ...the smallest emotion, but very soon to see them without recollecting a word of the matter; and having thus supported the dignity of her own sex, and spoken her decided censure of what was wrong in the other, she thought herself at liberty to attend to the interest of her own assemblies, and therefore determined (though rather against the opinion of Sir John) that as Mrs. Willoughby would at once be a woman of elegance and fortune, to leave her card with her as soon as she married.
    Chapter 32 (56% in)
  • Lady Middleton is really a most elegant woman!
    Chapter 33 (96% in)
  • And Mrs. Jennings too, an exceedingly well-behaved woman, though not so elegant as her daughter.
    Chapter 33 (97% in)
  • So well had they recommended themselves to Lady Middleton, so agreeable had their assiduities made them to her, that though Lucy was certainly not so elegant, and her sister not even genteel, she was as ready as Sir John to ask them to spend a week or two in Conduit Street; and it happened to be particularly convenient to the Miss Steeles, as soon as the Dashwoods' invitation was known, that their visit should begin a few days before the party took place.
    Chapter 34 (24% in)
  • But there was no peculiar disgrace in this; for it was very much the case with the chief of their visitors, who almost all laboured under one or other of these disqualifications for being agreeable—Want of sense, either natural or improved—want of elegance—want of spirits—or want of temper.
    Chapter 34 (58% in)
  • "For my own part," said he, "I am excessively fond of a cottage; there is always so much comfort, so much elegance about them.
    Chapter 36 (65% in)
  • The openness and heartiness of her manner more than atoned for that want of recollection and elegance which made her often deficient in the forms of politeness; her kindness, recommended by so pretty a face, was engaging; her folly, though evident was not disgusting, because it was not conceited; and Elinor could have forgiven every thing but her laugh.
    Chapter 42 (61% in)
  • It happened to catch Sophia's eye before it caught mine—and its size, the elegance of the paper, the hand-writing altogether, immediately gave her a suspicion.
    Chapter 44 (71% in)

There are no more uses of "elegant" in Sense and Sensibility.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®