toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Go to Book

sufficient
used in Sense and Sensibility

13 uses
(click/touch triangles for details)
Definition
adequate (enough — often without being more than is needed)
  • Seven years would be insufficient to make some people acquainted with each other, and seven days are more than enough for others.
    Chapter 12 (21% in)
  • The situation of Barton, in a county so far distant from Sussex as Devonshire, which, but a few hours before, would have been a sufficient objection to outweigh every possible advantage belonging to the place, was now its first recommendation.
    Chapter 4 (88% in)
  • As to an additional servant, the expense would be a trifle; Mamma she was sure would never object to it; and any horse would do for HIM; he might always get one at the park; as to a stable, the merest shed would be sufficient.
    Chapter 12 (16% in)
  • "But if you write a note to the housekeeper, Mr. Brandon," said Marianne, eagerly, "will it not be sufficient?"
    Chapter 13 (22% in)
  • Willoughby may undoubtedly have very sufficient reasons for his conduct, and I will hope that he has.
    Chapter 15 (56% in)
  • Elinor could not deny the truth of this, and she tried to find in it a motive sufficient for their silence.
    Chapter 16 (22% in)
  • She began almost to feel a dislike of Edward; and it ended, as every feeling must end with her, by carrying back her thoughts to Willoughby, whose manners formed a contrast sufficiently striking to those of his brother elect.
    Chapter 16 (73% in)
  • They met for the sake of eating, drinking, and laughing together, playing at cards, or consequences, or any other game that was sufficiently noisy.
    Chapter 23 (61% in)
  • Her legal allowance was not adequate to her fortune, nor sufficient for her comfortable maintenance, and I learnt from my brother that the power of receiving it had been made over some months before to another person.
    Chapter 31 (57% in)
  • This would not, in itself, have been sufficient for the delicacy of Miss Dashwood;—but it was inforced with so much real politeness by Mr. Palmer himself, as, joined to the very great amendment of his manners towards them since her sister had been known to be unhappy, induced her to accept it with pleasure.
    Chapter 39 (10% in)
  • My affection for Marianne, my thorough conviction of her attachment to me—it was all insufficient to outweigh that dread of poverty, or get the better of those false ideas of the necessity of riches, which I was naturally inclined to feel, and expensive society had increased.
    Chapter 44 (41% in)
  • Their resemblance in good principles and good sense, in disposition and manner of thinking, would probably have been sufficient to unite them in friendship, without any other attraction; but their being in love with two sisters, and two sisters fond of each other, made that mutual regard inevitable and immediate, which might otherwise have waited the effect of time and judgment.
    Chapter 49 (78% in)
  • With an income quite sufficient to their wants thus secured to them, they had nothing to wait for after Edward was in possession of the living, but the readiness of the house, to which Colonel Brandon, with an eager desire for the accommodation of Elinor, was making considerable improvements; and after waiting some time for their completion, after experiencing, as usual, a thousand disappointments and delays from the unaccountable dilatoriness of the workmen, Elinor, as usual, broke...
    Chapter 50 (18% in)

There are no more uses of "sufficient" in Sense and Sensibility.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®