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acquit
used in Sense and Sensibility

7 uses
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1  —2 uses as in:
she was acquitted
Definition
to officially find "not guilty" of criminal charges; or (informally) to find someone innocent of a charge of having done wrong
  • Sometimes she could believe Willoughby to be as unfortunate and as innocent as herself, and at others, lost every consolation in the impossibility of acquitting him.
    Chapter 31 (3% in)
acquitting = finding innocent
  • Willoughby, "poor Willoughby," as she now allowed herself to call him, was constantly in her thoughts; she would not but have heard his vindication for the world, and now blamed, now acquitted herself for having judged him so harshly before.
    Chapter 45 (31% in)
acquitted = found blameless
There are no more uses of "acquit" flagged with this meaning in Sense and Sensibility.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
?  —5 uses
exact meaning not specified
  • I acquit Edward of essential misconduct.
    Chapter 37 (48% in)
  • —I am happy—and he is acquitted.
    Chapter 15 (59% in)
  • My feelings are at present in a state of dreadful indecision; I wish to acquit you, but certainty on either side will be ease to what I now suffer.
    Chapter 29 (72% in)
  • Cruel, cruel—nothing can acquit you.
    Chapter 29 (90% in)
  • "I have been more pained," said she, "by her endeavors to acquit him than by all the rest; for it irritates her mind more than the most perfect conviction of his unworthiness can do.
    Chapter 31 (93% in)

There are no more uses of "acquit" in Sense and Sensibility.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®