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fetter
used in Sense and Sensibility

4 uses
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Definition
to restrain or hinder

or more archaically:

a shackle for the ankles
  • The shortness of his visit, the steadiness of his purpose in leaving them, originated in the same fettered inclination, the same inevitable necessity of temporizing with his mother.
    Chapter 19 (12% in)
  • Or at least, if she did not bring herself quite to rejoice in Edward's being fettered to Lucy, she determined, that had Lucy been more amiable, she OUGHT to have rejoiced.
    Chapter 35 (6% in)
  • And even now, I cannot comprehend on what motive she acted, or what fancied advantage it could be to her, to be fettered to a man for whom she had not the smallest regard, and who had only two thousand pounds in the world.
    Chapter 49 (55% in)
  • And at any rate, she lost nothing by continuing the engagement, for she has proved that it fettered neither her inclination nor her actions.
    Chapter 49 (57% in)

There are no more uses of "fetter" in Sense and Sensibility.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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