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scorn
used in Jane Eyre

17 uses
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Definition
disrespect or reject as not good enough
  • At Lowood, indeed, I took that resolution, kept it, and succeeded in pleasing; but with Mrs. Reed, I remember my best was always spurned with scorn.
    Chapter 11 (11% in)
  • ...and prominent, mouth and nose sufficiently regular; under her light eyebrows glimmered an eye devoid of ruth; her skin was dark and opaque, her hair nearly flaxen; her constitution was sound as a bell — illness never came near her; she was an exact, clever manager; her household and tenantry were thoroughly under her control; her children only at times defied her authority and laughed it to scorn; she dressed well, and had a presence and port calculated to set off handsome attire.
    Chapter 4 (68% in)
  • Willingly would I now have gone and asked Mrs. Reed's pardon; but I knew, partly from experience and partly from instinct, that was the way to make her repulse me with double scorn, thereby re-exciting every turbulent impulse of my nature.
    Chapter 4 (85% in)
  • ...and besides the race of men, there is an invisible world and a kingdom of spirits: that world is round us, for it is everywhere; and those spirits watch us, for they are commissioned to guard us; and if we were dying in pain and shame, if scorn smote us on all sides, and hatred crushed us, angels see our tortures, recognise our innocence (if innocent we be: as I know you are of this charge which Mr. Brocklehurst has weakly and pompously repeated at second-hand from Mrs. Reed; for I...
    Chapter 8 (25% in)
  • ...in the course of your future life you will often find yourself elected the involuntary confidant of your acquaintances' secrets: people will instinctively find out, as I have done, that it is not your forte to tell of yourself, but to listen while others talk of themselves; they will feel, too, that you listen with no malevolent scorn of their indiscretion, but with a kind of innate sympathy; not the less comforting and encouraging because it is very unobtrusive in its manifestations."
    Chapter 14 (65% in)
  • A woman who could betray me for such a rival was not worth contending for; she deserved only scorn; less, however, than I, who had been her dupe.
    Chapter 15 (33% in)
  • ...I had learnt to love Mr. Rochester: I could not unlove him now, merely because I found that he had ceased to notice me — because I might pass hours in his presence, and he would never once turn his eyes in my direction — because I saw all his attentions appropriated by a great lady, who scorned to touch me with the hem of her robes as she passed; who, if ever her dark and imperious eye fell on me by chance, would withdraw it instantly as from an object too mean to merit observation.
    Chapter 18 (27% in)
  • I would scorn such a union: therefore I am better than you — let me go!
    Chapter 23 (67% in)
  • I dangers dared; I hindrance scorned I omens did defy: Whatever menaced, harassed, warned, I passed impetuous by.
    Chapter 24 (87% in)
  • Yes; I feel now that I was right when I adhered to principle and law, and scorned and crushed the insane promptings of a frenzied moment.
    Chapter 31 (22% in)
  • I scorn the weakness.
    Chapter 32 (86% in)
  • He also advised me to be composed; I scorned the insinuation of helplessness and distraction, shook off his hand, and began to walk about again.
    Chapter 33 (77% in)
  • "I scorn your idea of love," I could not help saying, as I rose up and stood before him, leaning my back against the rock.
    Chapter 34 (93% in)
  • I scorn the counterfeit sentiment you offer: yes, St. John, and I scorn you when you offer it.
    Chapter 34 (93% in)
  • I scorn the counterfeit sentiment you offer: yes, St. John, and I scorn you when you offer it.
    Chapter 34 (93% in)
  • "I scarcely expected to hear that expression from you," he said: "I think I have done and uttered nothing to deserve scorn."
    Chapter 34 (94% in)
  • Both by nature and principle, he was superior to the mean gratification of vengeance: he had forgiven me for saying I scorned him and his love, but he had not forgotten the words; and as long as he and I lived he never would forget them.
    Chapter 35 (3% in)

There are no more uses of "scorn" in Jane Eyre.

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