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tempered
used in Jane Eyre

6 uses
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1  —1 use as in:
short-tempered
Definition
having a typical mood or temperament — often in reference to how easily one is angered
  • "And what a sweet-tempered forehead he has!" cried Louisa, — "so smooth — none of those frowning irregularities I dislike so much; and such a placid eye and smile!"
    Chapter 18 (69% in)

There are no more uses of "tempered" flagged with this meaning in Jane Eyre.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
?  —5 uses
exact meaning not specified
  • On that occasion, he again, with a full heart, acknowledged that God had tempered judgment with mercy.
    Chapter 38 — Conclusion (75% in)
  • Mrs. Fairfax turned out to be what she appeared, a placid-tempered, kind-natured woman, of competent education and average intelligence.
    Chapter 12 (1% in)
  • Feeling without judgment is a washy draught indeed; but judgment untempered by feeling is too bitter and husky a morsel for human deglutition.
    Chapter 21 (82% in)
  • Jane, I am not a gentle-tempered man — you forget that: I am not long-enduring; I am not cool and dispassionate.
    Chapter 27 (28% in)
  • As she grew up, a sound English education corrected in a great measure her French defects; and when she left school, I found in her a pleasing and obliging companion: docile, good-tempered, and well-principled.
    Chapter 38 — Conclusion (42% in)

There are no more uses of "tempered" in Jane Eyre.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®