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sordid
used in Jane Eyre

5 uses
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Definition
morally degraded; or foul and repulsive
  • Amidst this sordid scene, sat a man with his clenched hands resting on his knees, and his eyes bent on the ground.
    Chapter 18 (19% in)
  • "The glamour of inexperience is over your eyes," he answered; "and you see it through a charmed medium: you cannot discern that the gilding is slime and the silk draperies cobwebs; that the marble is sordid slate, and the polished woods mere refuse chips and scaly bark.
    Chapter 20 (71% in)
  • I could not bear to return to the sordid village, where, besides, no prospect of aid was visible.
    Chapter 28 (34% in)
  • Powerful angels, safe in heaven! they smile when sordid souls triumph, and feeble ones weep over their destruction.
    Chapter 32 (48% in)
  • I had entreated him to keep quite clear of the house till everything was arranged: and, indeed, the bare idea of the commotion, at once sordid and trivial, going on within its walls sufficed to scare him to estrangement.
    Chapter 34 (15% in)

There are no more uses of "sordid" in Jane Eyre.

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