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pompous
used in Jane Eyre

3 uses
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Definition
behaving with excessive self-importance — often with exaggerated dignity or ceremonial splendor

or more rarely:  showing ceremonial splendor (pomp)
  • She had, likewise, a fierce and a hard eye: it reminded me of Mrs. Reed's; she mouthed her words in speaking; her voice was deep, its inflections very pompous, very dogmatical, — very intolerable, in short.
    Chapter 17 (53% in)
  • ...us, for they are commissioned to guard us; and if we were dying in pain and shame, if scorn smote us on all sides, and hatred crushed us, angels see our tortures, recognise our innocence (if innocent we be: as I know you are of this charge which Mr. Brocklehurst has weakly and pompously repeated at second-hand from Mrs. Reed; for I read a sincere nature in your ardent eyes and on your clear front), and God waits only the separation of spirit from flesh to crown us with a full reward.
    Chapter 8 (26% in)
  • He is a harsh man; at once pompous and meddling; he cut off our hair; and for economy's sake bought us bad needles and thread, with which we could hardly sew."
    Chapter 13 (53% in)

There are no more uses of "pompous" in Jane Eyre.

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