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philanthropy
used in Jane Eyre

7 uses
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Definition
helping others — especially donating money to worthy causes; or an organization that does so
  • ...he yet did not appear to enjoy that mental serenity, that inward content, which should be the reward of every sincere Christian and practical philanthropist.
    Chapter 30 (25% in)
philanthropist = helping others
  • You would, perhaps, think me rude if I inquired in return whether you are a philanthropist?
    Chapter 14 (29% in)
  • No, young lady, I am not a general philanthropist; but I bear a conscience;" and he pointed to the prominences which are said to indicate that faculty, and which, fortunately for him, were sufficiently conspicuous; giving, indeed, a marked breadth to the upper part of his head: "and, besides, I once had a kind of rude tenderness of heart.
    Chapter 14 (30% in)
  • I need it, and I seek it so far, sir, that some true philanthropist will put me in the way of getting work which I can do, and the remuneration for which will keep me, if but in the barest necessaries of life.
    Chapter 29 (77% in)
  • I know not whether I am a true philanthropist; yet I am willing to aid you to the utmost of my power in a purpose so honest.
    Chapter 29 (78% in)
  • Won in youth to religion, she has cultivated my original qualities thus:— From the minute germ, natural affection, she has developed the overshadowing tree, philanthropy.
    Chapter 32 (92% in)
  • I believe you, St. John; for I am sure you are incapable of wishing any one ill; but, as I am your kinswoman, I should desire somewhat more of affection than that sort of general philanthropy you extend to mere strangers.
    Chapter 35 (15% in)

There are no more uses of "philanthropy" in Jane Eyre.

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