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imperious
used in Jane Eyre

4 uses
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Definition
expecting obedience; or arrogant; or domineering
  • I felt at times as if he were my relation rather than my master: yet he was imperious sometimes still; but I did not mind that; I saw it was his way.
    Chapter 15 (55% in)
  • ...I had learnt to love Mr. Rochester: I could not unlove him now, merely because I found that he had ceased to notice me — because I might pass hours in his presence, and he would never once turn his eyes in my direction — because I saw all his attentions appropriated by a great lady, who scorned to touch me with the hem of her robes as she passed; who, if ever her dark and imperious eye fell on me by chance, would withdraw it instantly as from an object too mean to merit observation.
    Chapter 18 (28% in)
  • The well-known face was there: stern, relentless as ever — there was that peculiar eye which nothing could melt, and the somewhat raised, imperious, despotic eyebrow.
    Chapter 21 (49% in)
  • "Answer me — speak again!" he ordered, imperiously and aloud.
    Chapter 37 (20% in)

There are no more uses of "imperious" in Jane Eyre.

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