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gaunt
used in Jane Eyre

3 uses
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Definition
very thin and bony — often from hunger or as though having been worn to the bone
  • Sir, it removed my veil from its gaunt head, rent it in two parts, and flinging both on the floor, trampled on them.
    Chapter 25 (79% in)
  • Yet, when this cherished volume was now placed in my hand — when I turned over its leaves, and sought in its marvellous pictures the charm I had, till now, never failed to find — all was eerie and dreary; the giants were gaunt goblins, the pigmies malevolent and fearful imps, Gulliver a most desolate wanderer in most dread and dangerous regions.
    Chapter 3 (39% in)
  • One afternoon (I had then been three weeks at Lowood), as I was sitting with a slate in my hand, puzzling over a sum in long division, my eyes, raised in abstraction to the window, caught sight of a figure just passing: I recognised almost instinctively that gaunt outline; and when, two minutes after, all the school, teachers included, rose en masse, it was not necessary for me to look up in order to ascertain whose entrance they thus greeted.
    Chapter 7 (23% in)

There are no more uses of "gaunt" in Jane Eyre.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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