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forlorn
used in Jane Eyre

6 uses
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Definition
sad, hopeless, pitiful and/or abandoned
  • "Yes," responded Abbot; "if she were a nice, pretty child, one might compassionate her forlornness; but one really cannot care for such a little toad as that."
    Chapter 3 (97% in)
  • Nor could I pass unnoticed the suggestion of the bleak shores of Lapland, Siberia, Spitzbergen, Nova Zembla, Iceland, Greenland, with "the vast sweep of the Arctic Zone, and those forlorn regions of dreary space, — that reservoir of frost and snow, where firm fields of ice, the accumulation of centuries of winters, glazed in Alpine heights above heights, surround the pole, and concentre the multiplied rigours of extreme cold."
    Chapter 1 (30% in)
  • My habitual mood of humiliation, self-doubt, forlorn depression, fell damp on the embers of my decaying ire.
    Chapter 2 (67% in)
  • Miss Ingram rose solemnly: "I go first," she said, in a tone which might have befitted the leader of a forlorn hope, mounting a breach in the van of his men.
    Chapter 18 (85% in)
  • This light was my forlorn hope: I must gain it.
    Chapter 28 (57% in)
  • "Let us rest here," said St. John, as we reached the first stragglers of a battalion of rocks, guarding a sort of pass, beyond which the beck rushed down a waterfall; and where, still a little farther, the mountain shook off turf and flower, had only heath for raiment and crag for gem — where it exaggerated the wild to the savage, and exchanged the fresh for the frowning — where it guarded the forlorn hope of solitude, and a last refuge for silence.
    Chapter 34 (57% in)

There are no more uses of "forlorn" in Jane Eyre.

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