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covet
used in Jane Eyre

5 uses
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Definition
to strongly want (something—especially something that belongs to another)
  • "Sir, you have now given me my 'cadeau;' I am obliged to you: it is the meed teachers most covet — praise of their pupils' progress."
    Chapter 13 (37% in)
  • I liked the hush, the gloom, the quaintness of these retreats in the day; but I by no means coveted a night's repose on one of those wide and heavy beds: shut in, some of them, with doors of oak; shaded, others, with wrought old English hangings crusted with thick work, portraying effigies of strange flowers, and stranger birds, and strangest human beings, — all which would have looked strange, indeed, by the pallid gleam of moonlight.
    Chapter 11 (86% in)
  • Nothing ever rode the Gytrash: it was always alone; and goblins, to my notions, though they might tenant the dumb carcasses of beasts, could scarce covet shelter in the commonplace human form.
    Chapter 12 (48% in)
  • I coveted a cake of bread.
    Chapter 28 (23% in)
  • He continued to gaze at the picture: the longer he looked, the firmer he held it, the more he seemed to covet it.
    Chapter 32 (58% in)

There are no more uses of "covet" in Jane Eyre.

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