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regal
used in Moby Dick

4 uses
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Definition
so fine, magnificent, or dignified as to be suitable for royalty; or belonging to a king or queen
  • And not only that, but moody stricken Ahab stood before them with a crucifixion in his face; in all the nameless regal overbearing dignity of some mighty woe.
    Chapters 28-30 — Ahab; (Enter Ahab; to Him, Stubb); The Pipe (39% in)
  • Much might be ruminated here, concerning the essential dignity of this regal process, because in common life we esteem but meanly and contemptibly a fellow who anoints his hair, and palpably smells of that anointing.
    Chapters 25-27 — Postscript; Knights and Squires; Knights and Squires (5% in)
  • But he who in the rightly regal and intelligent spirit presides over his own private dinner-table of invited guests, that man's unchallenged power and dominion of individual influence for the time; that man's royalty of state transcends Belshazzar's, for Belshazzar was not the greatest.
    Chapters 34-36 — The Cabin-Table; The Mast-Head; The Qarter-Deck—Ahab and all (6% in)
  • From my forenoon watch below, I ascended to the overclouded deck; and there, dashed upon the main hatches, I saw a regal, feathery thing of unspotted whiteness, and with a hooked, Roman bill sublime.
    Chapters 40-42 — Midnight, Forecastle; Moby Dick; The Whiteness of the Whale (71% in)

There are no more uses of "regal" in Moby Dick.

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