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guise
used in Moby Dick

3 uses
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Definition
a deceptive outward appearance

or more rarely:

any outward appearance — especially one that is new or clever
  • But could it be possible that any sober harpooneer would get into a door mat, and parade the streets of any Christian town in that sort of guise?
    Chapters 1-3 -- Loomings; The Carpet-Bag; The Spouter-Inn (79% in)
  • Peleg!" said Bildad, lifting his eyes and hands, "thou thyself, as I myself, hast seen many a perilous time; thou knowest, Peleg, what it is to have the fear of death; how, then, can'st thou prate in this ungodly guise.
    Chapters 16-18 -- The Ship; The Ramadan; His Mark (98% in)
  • The brigandish guise which the Canaller so proudly sports; his slouched and gaily-ribboned hat betoken his grand features.
    Chapters 52-54 -- The Albatross; The Gam; The Town-Ho's Story (57% in)

There are no more uses of "guise" in Moby Dick.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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