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quaint
used in Moby Dick

3 uses
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Definition
unusual in an interesting or pleasing way — especially when old-fashioned
  • You may have seen many a quaint craft in your day, for aught I know;—square-toed luggers; mountainous Japanese junks; butter-box galliots, and what not; but take my word for it, you never saw such a rare old craft as this same rare old Pequod.
    Chapters 16-18 -- The Ship; The Ramadan; His Mark (5% in)
  • Old Captain Peleg, many years her chief-mate, before he commanded another vessel of his own, and now a retired seaman, and one of the principal owners of the Pequod,—this old Peleg, during the term of his chief-mateship, had built upon her original grotesqueness, and inlaid it, all over, with a quaintness both of material and device, unmatched by anything except it be Thorkill-Hake's carved buckler or bedstead.
    Chapters 16-18 -- The Ship; The Ramadan; His Mark (8% in)
  • One old Sag-Harbor whaleman's chief reason for questioning the Hebrew story was this:—He had one of those quaint old-fashioned Bibles, embellished with curious, unscientific plates; one of which represented Jonah's whale with two spouts in his head—a peculiarity only true with respect to a species of the Leviathan (the Right Whale, and the varieties of that order), concerning which the fishermen have this saying, "A penny roll would choke him"; his swallow is so very small.
    Chapters 82-84 -- The Honour and Glory of Whaling; Jonah Historically Regarded; Pitchpoling (45% in)

There are no more uses of "quaint" in Moby Dick.

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