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pagan
used in Moby Dick

29 uses
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Definition
an offensive term for a person who follows a non-mainstream religion
  • And besides all this, there was a certain lofty bearing about the Pagan, which even his uncouthness could not altogether maim.
    Chapters 10-12 -- A Bosom Friend; Nightgown; Biographical (9% in)
  • All these strange antics were accompanied by still stranger guttural noises from the devotee, who seemed to be praying in a sing-song or else singing some pagan psalmody or other, during which his face twitched about in the most unnatural manner.
    Chapters 1-3 -- Loomings; The Carpet-Bag; The Spouter-Inn (93% in)
  • Now, take away the awful fear, and my sensations at feeling the supernatural hand in mine were very similar, in their strangeness, to those which I experienced on waking up and seeing Queequeg's pagan arm thrown round me.
    Chapters 4-6 -- The Counter-Pane; Breakfast; The Street (21% in)
  • I'll try a pagan friend, thought I, since Christian kindness has proved but hollow courtesy.
    Chapters 10-12 -- A Bosom Friend; Nightgown; Biographical (28% in)
  • If there yet lurked any ice of indifference towards me in the Pagan's breast, this pleasant, genial smoke we had, soon thawed it out, and left us cronies.
    Chapters 10-12 -- A Bosom Friend; Nightgown; Biographical (34% in)
  • But what is worship? thought I. Do you suppose now, Ishmael, that the magnanimous God of heaven and earth—pagans and all included—can possibly be jealous of an insignificant bit of black wood?
    Chapters 10-12 -- A Bosom Friend; Nightgown; Biographical (43% in)
  • Thought he, it's a wicked world in all meridians; I'll die a pagan.
    Chapters 10-12 -- A Bosom Friend; Nightgown; Biographical (89% in)
  • He answered no, not yet; and added that he was fearful Christianity, or rather Christians, had unfitted him for ascending the pure and undefiled throne of thirty pagan Kings before him.
    Chapters 10-12 -- A Bosom Friend; Nightgown; Biographical (92% in)
  • So that there are instances among them of men, who, named with Scripture names—a singularly common fashion on the island—and in childhood naturally imbibing the stately dramatic thee and thou of the Quaker idiom; still, from the audacious, daring, and boundless adventure of their subsequent lives, strangely blend with these unoutgrown peculiarities, a thousand bold dashes of character, not unworthy a Scandinavian sea-king, or a poetical Pagan Roman.
    Chapters 16-18 -- The Ship; The Ramadan; His Mark (27% in)
  • I say, we good Presbyterian Christians should be charitable in these things, and not fancy ourselves so vastly superior to other mortals, pagans and what not, because of their half-crazy conceits on these subjects.
    Chapters 16-18 -- The Ship; The Ramadan; His Mark (61% in)
  • All our arguing with him would not avail; let him be, I say: and Heaven have mercy on us all—Presbyterians and Pagans alike—for we are all somehow dreadfully cracked about the head, and sadly need mending.
    Chapters 16-18 -- The Ship; The Ramadan; His Mark (62% in)
  • Think of it; sleeping all night in the same room with a wide awake pagan on his hams in this dreary, unaccountable Ramadan!
    Chapters 16-18 -- The Ship; The Ramadan; His Mark (77% in)
  • He looked at me with a sort of condescending concern and compassion, as though he thought it a great pity that such a sensible young man should be so hopelessly lost to evangelical pagan piety.
    Chapters 16-18 -- The Ship; The Ramadan; His Mark (84% in)
  • ...broad-skirted drab coat, took out a bundle of tracts, and selecting one entitled "The Latter Day Coming; or No Time to Lose," placed it in Queequeg's hands, and then grasping them and the book with both his, looked earnestly into his eyes, and said, "Son of darkness, I must do my duty by thee; I am part owner of this ship, and feel concerned for the souls of all its crew; if thou still clingest to thy Pagan ways, which I sadly fear, I beseech thee, remain not for aye a Belial bondsman.
    Chapters 16-18 -- The Ship; The Ramadan; His Mark (96% in)
  • And never having been anywhere in the world but in Africa, Nantucket, and the pagan harbors most frequented by whalemen; and having now led for many years the bold life of the fishery in the ships of owners uncommonly heedful of what manner of men they shipped; Daggoo retained all his barbaric virtues, and erect as a giraffe, moved about the decks in all the pomp of six feet five in his socks.
    Chapters 25-27 -- Postscript; Knights and Squires; Knights and Squires (86% in)
  • The Pagan leopards—the unrecking and unworshipping things, that live; and seek, and give no reasons for the torrid life they feel!
    Chapters 34-36 -- The Cabin-Table; The Mast-Head; The Qarter-Deck--Ahab and all (86% in)
  • And now, ye mates, I do appoint ye three cupbearers to my three pagan kinsmen there—yon three most honourable gentlemen and noblemen, my valiant harpooneers.
    Chapters 34-36 -- The Cabin-Table; The Mast-Head; The Qarter-Deck--Ahab and all (96% in)
  • Eh, Pagan?
    Chapters 40-42 -- Midnight, Forecastle; Moby Dick; The Whiteness of the Whale (10% in)
  • There's your true Ashantee, gentlemen; there howl your pagans; where you ever find them, next door to you; under the long-flung shadow, and the snug patronising lee of churches.
    Chapters 52-54 -- The Albatross; The Gam; The Town-Ho's Story (54% in)
  • And let no man doubt this Arkite story; for in the ancient Joppa, now Jaffa, on the Syrian coast, in one of the Pagan temples, there stood for many ages the vast skeleton of a whale, which the city's legends and all the inhabitants asserted to be the identical bones of the monster that Perseus slew.
    Chapters 82-84 -- The Honour and Glory of Whaling; Jonah Historically Regarded; Pitchpoling (9% in)
  • But then there were some sceptical Greeks and Romans, who, standing out from the orthodox pagans of their times, equally doubted the story of Hercules and the whale, and Arion and the dolphin; and yet their doubting those traditions did not make those traditions one whit the less facts, for all that.
    Chapters 82-84 -- The Honour and Glory of Whaling; Jonah Historically Regarded; Pitchpoling (43% in)
  • Standing on this were the Tartarean shapes of the pagan harpooneers, always the whale-ship's stokers.
    Chapters 94-96 -- A Squeeze of the Hand; The Cassock; The Try-Works (71% in)
  • Now, at this time it was that my poor pagan companion, and fast bosom-friend, Queequeg, was seized with a fever, which brought him nigh to his endless end.
    Chapters 109-111 -- Ahab and Starbuck in the Cabin; Queequeg in his Coffin; The Pacific (31% in)
  • And a well, or an ice-house, it somehow proved to him, poor pagan; where, strange to say, for all the heat of his sweatings, he caught a terrible chill which lapsed into a fever; and at last, after some days' suffering, laid him in his hammock, close to the very sill of the door of death.
    Chapters 109-111 -- Ahab and Starbuck in the Cabin; Queequeg in his Coffin; The Pacific (36% in)
  • What say ye, pagans!
    Chapters 112-114 -- The Blacksmith; The Forge; The Gilder (67% in)
  • But as ever before, the pagan harpooneers remained almost wholly unimpressed; or if impressed, it was only with a certain magnetism shot into their congenial hearts from inflexible Ahab's.
    Chapters 124-126 -- The Needle; The Log and Line; The Life-Buoy (19% in)
  • The Christian or civilized part of the crew said it was mermaids, and shuddered; but the pagan harpooneers remained unappalled.
    Chapters 124-126 -- The Needle; The Log and Line; The Life-Buoy (69% in)
  • But when three or four days had slided by, after meeting the children-seeking Rachel; and no spout had yet been seen; the monomaniac old man seemed distrustful of his crew's fidelity; at least, of nearly all except the Pagan harpooneers; he seemed to doubt, even, whether Stubb and Flask might not willingly overlook the sight he sought.
    Chapters 130-132 -- The Hat; The Pequod meets the Delight; The Symphony (26% in)
  • Soon they through dim, bewildering mediums saw her sidelong fading phantom, as in the gaseous Fata Morgana; only the uppermost masts out of water; while fixed by infatuation, or fidelity, or fate, to their once lofty perches, the pagan harpooneers still maintained their sinking lookouts on the sea.
    Chapters 133-135 -- The Chase--First Day; The Chase--Second Day; The Chase--Third Day (97% in)

There are no more uses of "pagan" in Moby Dick.

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