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consternation
used in Moby Dick

10 uses
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Definition
dismay (unhappiness, worry, and often confusion) — typically over something unexpected
  • For, when swimming before his exulting pursuers, with every apparent symptom of alarm, he had several times been known to turn round suddenly, and, bearing down upon them, either stave their boats to splinters, or drive them back in consternation to their ship.
    Chapters 40-42 -- Midnight, Forecastle; Moby Dick; The Whiteness of the Whale (41% in)
  • In the midst of this consternation, Queequeg dropped deftly to his knees, and crawling under the path of the boom, whipped hold of a rope, secured one end to the bulwarks, and then flinging the other like a lasso, caught it round the boom as it swept over his head, and at the next jerk, the spar was that way trapped, and all was safe.
    Chapters 13-15 -- Wheelbarrow; Nantucket; Chowder (39% in)
  • And as if the now tested reality of his might had in former legendary times thrown its shadow before it; we find some book naturalists—Olassen and Povelson—declaring the Sperm Whale not only to be a consternation to every other creature in the sea, but also to be so incredibly ferocious as continually to be athirst for human blood.
    Chapters 40-42 -- Midnight, Forecastle; Moby Dick; The Whiteness of the Whale (30% in)
  • It cannot well be doubted, that the one visible quality in the aspect of the dead which most appals the gazer, is the marble pallor lingering there; as if indeed that pallor were as much like the badge of consternation in the other world, as of mortal trepidation here.
    Chapters 40-42 -- Midnight, Forecastle; Moby Dick; The Whiteness of the Whale (81% in)
  • "In our way thither," he says, "about four o'clock in the morning, when we were about one hundred and fifty leagues from the Main of America, our ship felt a terrible shock, which put our men in such consternation that they could hardly tell where they were or what to think; but every one began to prepare for death.
    Chapters 43-45 -- Hark!; The Chart; The Affidavit (86% in)
  • "Man overboard!" cried Daggoo, who amid the general consternation first came to his senses.
    Chapters 76-78 -- The Battering-Ram; The Great Heidelburgh Tun; Cistern and Buckets (65% in)
  • The compact martial columns in which they had been hitherto rapidly and steadily swimming, were now broken up in one measureless rout; and like King Porus' elephants in the Indian battle with Alexander, they seemed going mad with consternation.
    Chapters 85-87 -- The Fountain; The Tail; The Grand Armada (67% in)
  • Upon this the poor mariners in their respectful consternation—so truly English—knowing not what to say, fall to vigorously scratching their heads all round; meanwhile ruefully glancing from the whale to the stranger.
    Chapters 88-90 -- Schools and Schoolmasters; Fast-Fish and Loose-Fish; Heads or Tails (83% in)
  • The involuntary consternation of the moment caused him to leap, paddle in hand, out of the boat; and in such a way, that part of the slack whale line coming against his chest, he breasted it overboard with him, so as to become entangled in it, when at last plumping into the water.
    Chapters 91-93 -- The Pequod Meets The Rose-Bud; Ambergris; The Castaway (81% in)
  • Overhearing the indignant but half-humorous cries with which the people on deck began to drive the coffin away, Queequeg, to every one's consternation, commanded that the thing should be instantly brought to him, nor was there any denying him; seeing that, of all mortals, some dying men are the most tyrannical; and certainly, since they will shortly trouble us so little for evermore, the poor fellows ought to be indulged.
    Chapters 109-111 -- Ahab and Starbuck in the Cabin; Queequeg in his Coffin; The Pacific (58% in)

There are no more uses of "consternation" in Moby Dick.

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