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passage
used in A Tale of Two Cities

15 uses
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1  —2 uses as in:
In lines 1-9 of the passage...
Definition
a short part of a longer written work
  • That, Virtue, as had been observed by the poets (in many passages which he well knew the jury would have, word for word, at the tips of their tongues; whereat the jury's countenances displayed a guilty consciousness that they knew nothing about the passages), was in a manner contagious; more especially the bright virtue known as patriotism, or love of country.
    2.3 — A Disappointment (6% in)
passages = short parts of longer written works
  • That, Virtue, as had been observed by the poets (in many passages which he well knew the jury would have, word for word, at the tips of their tongues; whereat the jury's countenances displayed a guilty consciousness that they knew nothing about the passages), was in a manner contagious; more especially the bright virtue known as patriotism, or love of country.
    2.3 — A Disappointment (6% in)
passages = short parts of longer written works
There are no more uses of "passage" flagged with this meaning in A Tale of Two Cities.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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?  —13 uses
exact meaning not specified
  • Keys turned, doors clashed, footsteps passed along distant passages: no cry was raised, or hurry made, that seemed unusual.
    3.13 — Fifty-two (66% in)
  • The weather was stormy, and the passage long and rough, and I lay on a sofa, almost from shore to shore.
    2.3 — A Disappointment (37% in)
  • How the virtuous servant, Cly, was his friend and partner, and was worthy to be; how the watchful eyes of those forgers and false swearers had rested on the prisoner as a victim, because some family affairs in France, he being of French extraction, did require his making those passages across the Channel—though what those affairs were, a consideration for others who were near and dear to him, forbade him, even for his life, to disclose.
    2.3 — A Disappointment (73% in)
  • An hour and a half limped heavily away in the thief-and-rascal crowded passages below, even though assisted off with mutton pies and ale.
    2.3 — A Disappointment (96% in)
  • From the dimly-lighted passages of the court, the last sediment of the human stew that had been boiling there all day, was straining off, when Doctor Manette, Lucie Manette, his daughter, Mr. Lorry, the solicitor for the defence, and its counsel, Mr. Stryver, stood gathered round Mr. Charles Darnay—just released—congratulating him on his escape from death.
    2.4 — Congratulatory (0% in)
  • The lights were nearly all extinguished in the passages, the iron gates were being closed with a jar and a rattle, and the dismal place was deserted until to-morrow morning's interest of gallows, pillory, whipping-post, and branding-iron, should repeople it.
    2.4 — Congratulatory (34% in)
  • Mr. Stryver had left them in the passages, to shoulder his way back to the robing-room.
    2.4 — Congratulatory (37% in)
  • But, he said not a single word in reference to the discovery that had been told of, and, as they went into the house, the business eye of Mr. Lorry either detected, or fancied it detected, on his face, as it turned towards Charles Darnay, the same singular look that had been upon it when it turned towards him in the passages of the Court House.
    2.6 — Hundreds of People (83% in)
  • Their three heads had been close together during this brief discourse, and it had been as much as they could do to hear one another, even then: so tremendous was the noise of the living ocean, in its irruption into the Fortress, and its inundation of the courts and passages and staircases.
    2.21 — Echoing Footsteps (70% in)
  • Lucie with her arms stretched out to him, and with that old look of earnestness so concentrated and intensified, that it seemed as though it had been stamped upon her face expressly to give force and power to it in this one passage of her life.
    3.2 — The Grindstone (38% in)
  • The passage to the Conciergerie was short and dark; the night in its vermin-haunted cells was long and cold.
    3.6 — Triumph (17% in)
  • They put him into a great chair they had among them, and which they had taken either out of the Court itself, or one of its rooms or passages.
    3.6 — Triumph (82% in)
  • The quick noise and movement of the court's emptying itself by many passages had not ceased, when Lucie stood stretching out her arms towards her husband, with nothing in her face but love and consolation.
    3.11 — Dusk (7% in)

There are no more uses of "passage" in A Tale of Two Cities.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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