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Monsieur
used in A Tale of Two Cities

126 uses
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Definition
French equivalent to the English Mr.

or:

French equivalent to saying sir in English (a polite way to address a male)
  • Good day, monsieur.
    2.16 — Still Knitting (45% in)
Monsieur = Mr. (in French)
  • Like Monsieur Manette, your father, the gentleman was of Beauvais.
    1.4 — The Preparation (54% in)
  • Like Monsieur Manette, your father, the gentleman was of repute in Paris.
    1.4 — The Preparation (54% in)
  • Her look so discomposed him that he stopped, wandered, and began anew: "As I was saying; if Monsieur Manette had not died; if he had suddenly and silently disappeared; if he had been spirited away; if it had not been difficult to guess to what dreadful place, though no art could trace him; if he had an enemy in some compatriot who could exercise a privilege that I in my own time have known the boldest people afraid to speak of in a whisper, across the water there; for instance, the...
    1.4 — The Preparation (67% in)
  • "What the devil do you do in that galley there?" said Monsieur Defarge to himself; "I don't know you."
    1.5 — The Wine-shop (50% in)
  • "How goes it, Jacques?" said one of these three to Monsieur Defarge.
    1.5 — The Wine-shop (51% in)
  • "Every drop, Jacques," answered Monsieur Defarge.
    1.5 — The Wine-shop (51% in)
  • "It is not often," said the second of the three, addressing Monsieur Defarge, "that many of these miserable beasts know the taste of wine, or of anything but black bread and death.
    1.5 — The Wine-shop (52% in)
  • "It is so, Jacques," Monsieur Defarge returned.
    1.5 — The Wine-shop (53% in)
  • "You are right, Jacques," was the response of Monsieur Defarge.
    1.5 — The Wine-shop (56% in)
  • The eyes of Monsieur Defarge were studying his wife at her knitting when the elderly gentleman advanced from his corner, and begged the favour of a word.
    1.5 — The Wine-shop (60% in)
  • "Willingly, sir," said Monsieur Defarge, and quietly stepped with him to the door.
    1.5 — The Wine-shop (61% in)
  • Almost at the first word, Monsieur Defarge started and became deeply attentive.
    1.5 — The Wine-shop (62% in)
  • Mr. Jarvis Lorry and Miss Manette, emerging from the wine-shop thus, joined Monsieur Defarge in the doorway to which he had directed his own company just before.
    1.5 — The Wine-shop (63% in)
  • In the gloomy tilepaved entry to the gloomy tile-paved staircase, Monsieur Defarge bent down on one knee to the child of his old master, and put her hand to his lips.
    1.5 — The Wine-shop (64% in)
  • Thus, Monsieur Defarge, in a stern voice, to Mr. Lorry, as they began ascending the stairs.
    1.5 — The Wine-shop (66% in)
  • Yes," was the grim reply of Monsieur Defarge.
    1.5 — The Wine-shop (78% in)
  • Monsieur Defarge whispered it closer in his ear, and frowned heavily.
    1.5 — The Wine-shop (78% in)
  • "I forgot them in the surprise of your visit," explained Monsieur Defarge.
    1.5 — The Wine-shop (86% in)
  • There appearing to be no other door on that floor, and the keeper of the wine-shop going straight to this one when they were left alone, Mr. Lorry asked him in a whisper, with a little anger: "Do you make a show of Monsieur Manette?"
    1.5 — The Wine-shop (88% in)
  • "Good day!" said Monsieur Defarge, looking down at the white head that bent low over the shoemaking.
    1.6 — The Shoemaker (0% in)
  • "You have a visitor, you see," said Monsieur Defarge.
    1.6 — The Shoemaker (19% in)
  • Here is monsieur, who knows a well-made shoe when he sees one.
    1.6 — The Shoemaker (20% in)
  • Take it, monsieur.
    1.6 — The Shoemaker (20% in)
  • "Tell monsieur what kind of shoe it is, and the maker's name."
    1.6 — The Shoemaker (21% in)
  • "I said, couldn't you describe the kind of shoe, for monsieur's information?"
    1.6 — The Shoemaker (22% in)
  • As he held out his hand for the shoe that had been taken from him, Mr. Lorry said, still looking steadfastly in his face: "Monsieur Manette, do you remember nothing of me?"
    1.6 — The Shoemaker (31% in)
  • "Monsieur Manette"; Mr. Lorry laid his hand upon Defarge's arm; "do you remember nothing of this man?
    1.6 — The Shoemaker (31% in)
  • Is there no old banker, no old business, no old servant, no old time, rising in your mind, Monsieur Manette?
    1.6 — The Shoemaker (32% in)
  • "Have you recognised him, monsieur?" asked Defarge in a whisper.
    1.6 — The Shoemaker (38% in)
  • More than that; Monsieur Manette is, for all reasons, best out of France.
    1.6 — The Shoemaker (72% in)
  • Mr. Lorry and Monsieur Defarge had made all ready for the journey, and had brought with them, besides travelling cloaks and wrappers, bread and meat, wine, and hot coffee.
    1.6 — The Shoemaker (78% in)
  • Monsieur Defarge put this provender, and the lamp he carried, on the shoemaker's bench (there was nothing else in the garret but a pallet bed), and he and Mr. Lorry roused the captive, and assisted him to his feet.
    1.6 — The Shoemaker (79% in)
  • They began to descend; Monsieur Defarge going first with the lamp, Mr. Lorry closing the little procession.
    1.6 — The Shoemaker (84% in)
  • "See here then, Monsieur the Officer," said Defarge, getting down, and taking him gravely apart, "these are the papers of monsieur inside, with the white head.
    1.6 — The Shoemaker (94% in)
  • "See here then, Monsieur the Officer," said Defarge, getting down, and taking him gravely apart, "these are the papers of monsieur inside, with the white head.
    1.6 — The Shoemaker (95% in)
  • He dropped his voice, there was a flutter among the military lanterns, and one of them being handed into the coach by an arm in uniform, the eyes connected with the arm looked, not an every day or an every night look, at monsieur with the white head.
    1.6 — The Shoemaker (96% in)
  • At the gallows and the wheel—the axe was a rarity—Monsieur Paris, as it was the episcopal mode among his brother Professors of the provinces, Monsieur Orleans, and the rest, to call him, presided in this dainty dress.
    2.7 — Monseigneur in Town (49% in)
  • At the gallows and the wheel—the axe was a rarity—Monsieur Paris, as it was the episcopal mode among his brother Professors of the provinces, Monsieur Orleans, and the rest, to call him, presided in this dainty dress.
    2.7 — Monseigneur in Town (50% in)
  • "What has gone wrong?" said Monsieur, calmly looking out.
    2.7 — Monseigneur in Town (72% in)
  • "Pardon, Monsieur the Marquis!" said a ragged and submissive man, "it is a child."
    2.7 — Monseigneur in Town (73% in)
  • Excuse me, Monsieur the Marquis—it is a pity—yes.
    2.7 — Monseigneur in Town (74% in)
  • As the tall man suddenly got up from the ground, and came running at the carriage, Monsieur the Marquis clapped his hand for an instant on his sword-hilt.
    2.7 — Monseigneur in Town (75% in)
  • The people closed round, and looked at Monsieur the Marquis.
    2.7 — Monseigneur in Town (77% in)
  • Monsieur the Marquis ran his eyes over them all, as if they had been mere rats come out of their holes.
    2.7 — Monseigneur in Town (79% in)
  • Monsieur the Marquis, vendor of wine.
    2.7 — Monseigneur in Town (85% in)
  • Without deigning to look at the assemblage a second time, Monsieur the Marquis leaned back in his seat, and was just being driven away with the air of a gentleman who had accidentally broke some common thing, and had paid for it, and could afford to pay for it; when his ease was suddenly disturbed by a coin flying into his carriage, and ringing on its floor.
    2.7 — Monseigneur in Town (87% in)
  • "Hold!" said Monsieur the Marquis.
    2.7 — Monseigneur in Town (88% in)
  • Monsieur the Marquis in his travelling carriage (which might have been lighter), conducted by four post-horses and two postilions, fagged up a steep hill.
    2.8 — Monseigneur in the Country (4% in)
  • A blush on the countenance of Monsieur the Marquis was no impeachment of his high breeding; it was not from within; it was occasioned by an external circumstance beyond his control—the setting sun.
    2.8 — Monseigneur in the Country (6% in)
  • "It will die out," said Monsieur the Marquis, glancing at his hands, "directly."
    2.8 — Monseigneur in the Country (9% in)
  • Heralded by a courier in advance, and by the cracking of his postilions' whips, which twined snake-like about their heads in the evening air, as if he came attended by the Furies, Monsieur the Marquis drew up in his travelling carriage at the posting-house gate.
    2.8 — Monseigneur in the Country (27% in)
  • Monsieur the Marquis cast his eyes over the submissive faces that drooped before him, as the like of himself had drooped before Monseigneur of the Court—only the difference was, that these faces drooped merely to suffer and not to propitiate—when a grizzled mender of the roads joined the group.
    2.8 — Monseigneur in the Country (31% in)
  • The picture produced an immense sensation in the little crowd; but all eyes, without comparing notes with other eyes, looked at Monsieur the Marquis.
    2.8 — Monseigneur in the Country (49% in)
  • Put him aside, Monsieur Gabelle!
    2.8 — Monseigneur in the Country (52% in)
  • Monsieur Gabelle was the Postmaster, and some other taxing functionary united; he had come out with great obsequiousness to assist at this examination, and had held the examined by the drapery of his arm in an official manner.
    2.8 — Monseigneur in the Country (53% in)
  • Go aside!" said Monsieur Gabelle.
    2.8 — Monseigneur in the Country (55% in)
  • Some half-dozen other particular friends promptly hauled him out, and presented him breathless to Monsieur the Marquis.
    2.8 — Monseigneur in the Country (59% in)
  • The shadow of a large high-roofed house, and of many over-hanging trees, was upon Monsieur the Marquis by that time; and the shadow was exchanged for the light of a flambeau, as his carriage stopped, and the great door of his chateau was opened to him.
    2.8 — Monseigneur in the Country (98% in)
  • Monsieur Charles, whom I expect; is he arrived from England?
    2.8 — Monseigneur in the Country (99% in)
  • It was a heavy mass of building, that chateau of Monsieur the Marquis, with a large stone courtyard before it, and two stone sweeps of staircase meeting in a stone terrace before the principal door.
    2.9 — The Gorgon's Head (0% in)
  • Up the broad flight of shallow steps, Monsieur the Marquis, flambeau preceded, went from his carriage, sufficiently disturbing the darkness to elicit loud remonstrance from an owl in the roof of the great pile of stable building away among the trees.
    2.9 — The Gorgon's Head (2% in)
  • The great door clanged behind him, and Monsieur the Marquis crossed a hall grim with certain old boar-spears, swords, and knives of the chase; grimmer with certain heavy riding-rods and riding-whips, of which many a peasant, gone to his benefactor Death, had felt the weight when his lord was angry.
    2.9 — The Gorgon's Head (5% in)
  • Avoiding the larger rooms, which were dark and made fast for the night, Monsieur the Marquis, with his flambeau-bearer going on before, went up the staircase to a door in a corridor.
    2.9 — The Gorgon's Head (7% in)
  • But you are lost, Monsieur Charles, I see.
    2.9 — The Gorgon's Head (55% in)
  • Light Monsieur my nephew to his chamber there!
    2.9 — The Gorgon's Head (70% in)
  • —And burn Monsieur my nephew in his bed, if you will," he added to himself, before he rang his little bell again, and summoned his valet to his own bedroom.
    2.9 — The Gorgon's Head (70% in)
  • The valet come and gone, Monsieur the Marquis walked to and fro in his loose chamber-robe, to prepare himself gently for sleep, that hot still night.
    2.9 — The Gorgon's Head (71% in)
  • "I am cool now," said Monsieur the Marquis, "and may go to bed."
    2.9 — The Gorgon's Head (75% in)
  • The carol of the birds was loud and high, and, on the weather-beaten sill of the great window of the bedchamber of Monsieur the Marquis, one little bird sang its sweetest song with all its might.
    2.9 — The Gorgon's Head (83% in)
  • What did all this portend, and what portended the swift hoisting-up of Monsieur Gabelle behind a servant on horseback, and the conveying away of the said Gabelle (double-laden though the horse was), at a gallop, like a new version of the German ballad of Leonora?
    2.9 — The Gorgon's Head (97% in)
  • It lay back on the pillow of Monsieur the Marquis.
    2.9 — The Gorgon's Head (99% in)
  • There had been earlier drinking than usual in the wine-shop of Monsieur Defarge.
    2.15 — Knitting (0% in)
  • Monsieur Defarge sold a very thin wine at the best of times, but it would seem to have been an unusually thin wine that he sold at this time.
    2.15 — Knitting (1% in)
  • No vivacious Bacchanalian flame leaped out of the pressed grape of Monsieur Defarge: but, a smouldering fire that burnt in the dark, lay hidden in the dregs of it.
    2.15 — Knitting (2% in)
  • This had been the third morning in succession, on which there had been early drinking at the wine-shop of Monsieur Defarge.
    2.15 — Knitting (3% in)
  • It was high noontide, when two dusty men passed through his streets and under his swinging lamps: of whom, one was Monsieur Defarge: the other a mender of roads in a blue cap.
    2.15 — Knitting (10% in)
  • "Good day, gentlemen!" said Monsieur Defarge.
    2.15 — Knitting (12% in)
  • The mender of roads, blue cap in hand, wiped his swarthy forehead with it, and said, "Where shall I commence, monsieur?"
    2.15 — Knitting (23% in)
  • "Commence," was Monsieur Defarge's not unreasonable reply, "at the commencement."
    2.15 — Knitting (23% in)
  • "I saw him then, messieurs," began the mender of roads, "a year ago this running summer, underneath the carriage of the Marquis, hanging by the chain.
    2.15 — Knitting (23% in)
  • "When Monsieur the Marquis demands that evening, 'Say, what is he like?'
    2.15 — Knitting (27% in)
  • Monsieur the Marquis indicates me with his finger, standing near our little fountain, and says, 'To me!
    2.15 — Knitting (28% in)
  • My faith, messieurs, I offer nothing.
    2.15 — Knitting (29% in)
  • I stand aside, messieurs, by my heap of stones, to see the soldiers and their prisoner pass (for it is a solitary road, that, where any spectacle is well worth looking at), and at first, as they approach, I see no more than that they are six soldiers with a tall man bound, and that they are almost black to my sight—except on the side of the sun going to bed, where they have a red edge, messieurs.
    2.15 — Knitting (32% in)
  • I stand aside, messieurs, by my heap of stones, to see the soldiers and their prisoner pass (for it is a solitary road, that, where any spectacle is well worth looking at), and at first, as they approach, I see no more than that they are six soldiers with a tall man bound, and that they are almost black to my sight—except on the side of the sun going to bed, where they have a red edge, messieurs.
    2.15 — Knitting (34% in)
  • I hear, messieurs.
    2.15 — Knitting (54% in)
  • It is frightful, messieurs.
    2.15 — Knitting (67% in)
  • When I left the village, Monday evening as the sun was going to bed, and looked back from the hill, the shadow struck across the church, across the mill, across the prison—seemed to strike across the earth, messieurs, to where the sky rests upon it!
    2.15 — Knitting (68% in)
  • "That's all, messieurs.
    2.15 — Knitting (69% in)
  • Therefore, when Sunday came, the mender of roads was not enchanted (though he said he was) to find that madame was to accompany monsieur and himself to Versailles.
    2.15 — Knitting (85% in)
  • Madame Defarge and monsieur her husband returned amicably to the bosom of Saint Antoine, while a speck in a blue cap toiled through the darkness, and through the dust, and down the weary miles of avenue by the wayside, slowly tending towards that point of the compass where the chateau of Monsieur the Marquis, now in his grave, listened to the whispering trees.
    2.16 — Still Knitting (0% in)
  • Madame Defarge and monsieur her husband returned amicably to the bosom of Saint Antoine, while a speck in a blue cap toiled through the darkness, and through the dust, and down the weary miles of avenue by the wayside, slowly tending towards that point of the compass where the chateau of Monsieur the Marquis, now in his grave, listened to the whispering trees.
    2.16 — Still Knitting (1% in)
  • ...window of the bed-chamber where the murder was done, two fine dints were pointed out in the sculptured nose, which everybody recognised, and which nobody had seen of old; and on the scarce occasions when two or three ragged peasants emerged from the crowd to take a hurried peep at Monsieur the Marquis petrified, a skinny finger would not have pointed to it for a minute, before they all started away among the moss and leaves, like the more fortunate hares who could find a living there.
    2.16 — Still Knitting (6% in)
  • Monsieur Defarge alighted; knowing one or two of the soldiery there, and one of the police.
    2.16 — Still Knitting (11% in)
  • Monsieur Defarge's olfactory sense was by no means delicate, but the stock of wine smelt much stronger than it ever tasted, and so did the stock of rum and brandy and aniseed.
    2.16 — Still Knitting (22% in)
  • "You deceive yourself, monsieur," returned the keeper of the wine-shop.
    2.16 — Still Knitting (64% in)
  • "The pleasure of conversing with you, Monsieur Defarge, recalls to me," pursued the spy, "that I have the honour of cherishing some interesting associations with your name."
    2.16 — Still Knitting (70% in)
  • "It was to you," said the spy, "that his daughter came; and it was from your care that his daughter took him, accompanied by a neat brown monsieur; how is he called?
    2.16 — Still Knitting (74% in)
  • , it is a curious thing that she is going to marry the nephew of Monsieur the Marquis, for whom Gaspard was exalted to that height of so many feet; in other words, the present Marquis.
    2.16 — Still Knitting (80% in)
  • Having made, at least, this one hit, whatever it might prove to be worth, and no customers coming in to help him to any other, Mr. Barsad paid for what he had drunk, and took his leave: taking occasion to say, in a genteel manner, before he departed, that he looked forward to the pleasure of seeing Monsieur and Madame Defarge again.
    2.16 — Still Knitting (84% in)
  • "But it is very strange—now, at least, is it not very strange"—said Defarge, rather pleading with his wife to induce her to admit it, "that, after all our sympathy for Monsieur her father, and herself, her husband's name should be proscribed under your hand at this moment, by the side of that infernal dog's who has just left us?"
    2.16 — Still Knitting (89% in)
  • The meaning, monsieur?
    2.21 — Echoing Footsteps (68% in)
  • Monsieur, it is a cell.
    2.21 — Echoing Footsteps (68% in)
  • It was almost morning, when Defarge's wine-shop parted with its last knot of customers, and Monsieur Defarge said to madame his wife, in husky tones, while fastening the door: "At last it is come, my dear!"
    2.22 — The Sea Still Rises (95% in)
  • Monsieur Gabelle, chief functionary of the place, became uneasy; went out on his house-top alone, and looked in that direction too; glanced down from behind his chimneys at the darkening faces by the fountain below, and sent word to the sacristan who kept the keys of the church, that there might be need to ring the tocsin by-and-bye.
    2.23 — Fire Rises (54% in)
  • There was spurring and splashing through the darkness, and bridle was drawn in the space by the village fountain, and the horse in a foam stood at Monsieur Gabelle's door.
    2.23 — Fire Rises (66% in)
  • The general scarcity of everything, occasioned candles to be borrowed in a rather peremptory manner of Monsieur Gabelle; and in a moment of reluctance and hesitation on that functionary's part, the mender of roads, once so submissive to authority, had remarked that carriages were good to make bonfires with, and that post-horses would roast.
    2.23 — Fire Rises (75% in)
  • Not only that; but the village, light-headed with famine, fire, and bell-ringing, and bethinking itself that Monsieur Gabelle had to do with the collection of rent and taxes—though it was but a small instalment of taxes, and no rent at all, that Gabelle had got in those latter days—became impatient for an interview with him, and, surrounding his house, summoned him to come forth for personal conference.
    2.23 — Fire Rises (86% in)
  • Whereupon, Monsieur Gabelle did heavily bar his door, and retire to hold counsel with himself.
    2.23 — Fire Rises (88% in)
  • Probably, Monsieur Gabelle passed a long night up there, with the distant chateau for fire and candle, and the beating at his door, combined with the joy-ringing, for music; not to mention his having an ill-omened lamp slung across the road before his posting-house gate, which the village showed a lively inclination to displace in his favour.
    2.23 — Fire Rises (91% in)
  • A trying suspense, to be passing a whole summer night on the brink of the black ocean, ready to take that plunge into it upon which Monsieur Gabelle had resolved!
    2.23 — Fire Rises (94% in)
  • But, the friendly dawn appearing at last, and the rush-candles of the village guttering out, the people happily dispersed, and Monsieur Gabelle came down bringing his life with him for that while.
    2.23 — Fire Rises (95% in)
  • To Monsieur heretofore the Marquis St. Evremonde, of France.
    2.24 — Drawn to the Loadstone Rock (42% in)
  • MONSIEUR HERETOFORE THE MARQUIS.
    2.24 — Drawn to the Loadstone Rock (60% in)
  • The crime for which I am imprisoned, Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, and for which I shall be summoned before the tribunal, and shall lose my life (without your so generous help), is, they tell me, treason against the majesty of the people, in that I have acted against them for an emigrant.
    2.24 — Drawn to the Loadstone Rock (61% in)
  • Ah! most gracious Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, where is that emigrant?
    2.24 — Drawn to the Loadstone Rock (64% in)
  • Ah Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, I send my desolate cry across the sea, hoping it may perhaps reach your ears through the great bank of Tilson known at Paris!
    2.24 — Drawn to the Loadstone Rock (64% in)
  • For the love of Heaven, of justice, of generosity, of the honour of your noble name, I supplicate you, Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, to succour and release me.
    2.24 — Drawn to the Loadstone Rock (65% in)
  • Oh Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, I pray you be you true to me!
    2.24 — Drawn to the Loadstone Rock (66% in)
  • From this prison here of horror, whence I every hour tend nearer and nearer to destruction, I send you, Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, the assurance of my dolorous and unhappy service.
    2.24 — Drawn to the Loadstone Rock (67% in)
  • Monsieur Gabelle had held the impoverished and involved estate on written instructions, to spare the people, to give them what little there was to give—such fuel as the heavy creditors would let them have in the winter, and such produce as could be saved from the same grip in the summer—and no doubt he had put the fact in plea and proof, for his own safety, so that it could not but appear now.
    2.24 — Drawn to the Loadstone Rock (75% in)
  • At last, when he appealed by name to Monsieur Lorry, an English gentleman then and there present, who, like himself, had been a witness on that English trial and could corroborate his account of it, the Jury declared that they had heard enough, and that they were ready with their votes if the President were content to receive them.
    3.6 — Triumph (63% in)
  • "'You see, monsieur, I am going to use them,' I replied, and said no more.
    3.10 — The Substance of the Shadow (25% in)
  • "'How has this been done, monsieur?' said I. "'A crazed young common dog!
    3.10 — The Substance of the Shadow (35% in)
  • "'Monsieur,' said I, 'in my profession, the communications of patients are always received in confidence.'
    3.10 — The Substance of the Shadow (65% in)

There are no more uses of "Monsieur" in A Tale of Two Cities.

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