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perverse
used in Pride and Prejudice

7 uses
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Definition
not what is expected, or considered proper

or: having the opposite effect of what is desired
  • Mr. Wickham's society was of material service in dispelling the gloom which the late perverse occurrences had thrown on many of the Longbourn family.
    Chapter 24 (93% in)
  • When they sat down to supper, therefore, she considered it a most unlucky perverseness which placed them within one of each other; and deeply was she vexed to find that her mother was talking to that one person (Lady Lucas) freely, openly, and of nothing else but her expectation that Jane would soon be married to Mr. Bingley.
    Chapter 18 (66% in)
  • It is very hard to think that she might have been Mr. Collins's wife by this time, had it not been for her own perverseness.
    Chapter 25 (23% in)
  • She felt all the perverseness of the mischance that should bring him where no one else was brought, and, to prevent its ever happening again, took care to inform him at first that it was a favourite haunt of hers.
    Chapter 33 (1% in)
  • She blushed again and again over the perverseness of the meeting.
    Chapter 43 (52% in)
  • As he quitted the room, Elizabeth felt how improbable it was that they should ever see each other again on such terms of cordiality as had marked their several meetings in Derbyshire; and as she threw a retrospective glance over the whole of their acquaintance, so full of contradictions and varieties, sighed at the perverseness of those feelings which would now have promoted its continuance, and would formerly have rejoiced in its termination.
    Chapter 46 (73% in)
  • ...good understanding to the efforts of his aunt, who did call on him in her return through London, and there relate her journey to Longbourn, its motive, and the substance of her conversation with Elizabeth; dwelling emphatically on every expression of the latter which, in her ladyship's apprehension, peculiarly denoted her perverseness and assurance; in the belief that such a relation must assist her endeavours to obtain that promise from her nephew which she had refused to give.
    Chapter 58 (31% in)

There are no more uses of "perverse" in Pride and Prejudice.

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