toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Go to Book

profound
used in To Kill a Mockingbird

2 meanings, 2 uses
(click/touch triangles for details)
1  —1 use as in:
profound idea
Definition
deep or far-reaching in intellect or consequence
  • Each child was supposed to clip an item from a newspaper, absorb its contents, and reveal them to the class. This practice allegedly overcame a variety of evils: standing in front of his fellows encouraged good posture and gave a child poise; delivering a short talk made him word-conscious; learning his current event strengthened his memory; being singled out made him more than ever anxious to return to the Group. The idea was profound, but as usual, in Maycomb it didn't work very well.
    p. 327.1
profound = deep or far-reaching in intellect or consequence
There are no more uses of "profound" flagged with this meaning in To Kill a Mockingbird.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
2  —1 use as in:
profound sadness
Definition
of greatest intensity or emotional depth
  • They persisted in pleading Not Guilty to first-degree murder, so there was nothing much Atticus could do for his clients except be present at their departure, an occasion that was probably the beginning of my father's profound distaste for the practice of criminal law.
    p. 5.9
profound = intense
There are no more uses of "profound" flagged with this meaning in To Kill a Mockingbird.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®