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profound
used in The Great Gatsby

2 meanings, 6 uses
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1  —1 use as in:
profound idea
Definition
deep or far-reaching in intellect or consequence
  • "Tom's getting very profound," said Daisy, with an expression of unthoughtful sadness. "He reads deep books with long words in them."
    p. 13.1
profound = deep or far-reaching in intellect or insight
There are no more uses of "profound" flagged with this meaning in The Great Gatsby.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
2  —5 uses as in:
profound sadness
Definition
of greatest intensity or emotional depth
  • ...and it occurred to me that there was no difference between men, in intelligence or race, so profound as the difference between the sick and the well.
    p. 124.4
profound = great in intensity
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • I had taken two finger-bowls of champagne, and the scene had changed before my eyes into something significant, elemental, and profound.
    p. 47.3
  • profound = intense
  • It was the hour of a profound human change, and excitement was generating on the air.
    p. 95.4
  • profound = intense
  • He was profoundly affected by the fact that Tom was there.
    p. 101.8
  • profoundly = intensely
  • They had never been closer in their month of love, nor communicated more profoundly one with another, than when she brushed silent lips against his coat's shoulder or when he touched the end of her fingers, gently, as though she were asleep.
    p. 150.8
profoundly = with intensity or emotional depth
There are no more uses of "profound" flagged with this meaning in The Great Gatsby.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®