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distinct

used in a sentence
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Definition clear, easily noticed, and/or identifiable as different or separate
  • Martinez and his colleagues identified 21 distinct emotions made by the human face.
distinct = different
  • Two distinct brain networks guide our judgments.
  • distinct = different
  • I distinctly remember my first kiss.
  • distinctly = clearly
  • In the early days, Facebook recognized two distinct genders. Now it has over 50.
  • distinct = clear and easily identified
  • She says it is a distinct possibility.
  • distinct = clear or identifiable
  • The differences in capabilities of a phone, tablet, and personal computer continue to grow less distinct.
  • distinct = clear or easily noticed
  • Which choice best summarizes the first paragraph of the passage:
    1. Population in the central city tends to grow and shrink at the same pace as population in the suburbs.
    2. Population growth in the central city and suburbs are two distinct phenomena.
  • distinct = different or separate
  • I wrote a special note in the front of mine distinctly asking him not to read it.
    Sharon Creech  --  Walk Two Moons
  • distinctly = clearly
  • As the men rounded a curve in the road, they became more distinct.
    Mildred D. Taylor  --  Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry
  • distinct = clearly seen
  • He heard the distinct shuffle of Peter's awkward footsteps behind him.
    Ben Mikaeslen  --  Touching Spirit Bear
  • distinct = easily identifiable
  • They were still too far away to see the camp, but he could hear a blend of indistinct voices.
    Louis Sachar  --  Holes
  • indistinct = not clear or easily identifiable
    (Editor's note:  The prefix "in-" in indistinct means not and reverses the meaning of distinct. This is the same pattern you see in words like invisible, incomplete, and insecure.)
  • 'I can smell him distinctly!' and at the word 'Snowball' all the dogs let out blood-curdling growls and showed their side teeth.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • distinctly = such that [his smell] is easily identifiable
  • She had an eyebrow ring, too, and I distinctly remember walking up to her as she was staring at a candle that was sitting on the windowsill in my grandmother's den and asking if she wanted any dessert.
    John Corey Whaley  --  Nogin
  • distinctly = in a manner that is easily identifiable
  • T.J. was still there, an indistinct blur blending into the gathering dusk, and I began to think that perhaps he would not go with the Simmses.
    Mildred D. Taylor  --  Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry
  • indistinct = not seen clearly
    (Editor's note:  The prefix "in-" in indistinct means not and reverses the meaning of distinct. This is the same pattern you see in words like invisible, incomplete, and insecure.)
  • "He looks different," I remarked when I could see T.J. more distinctly.
    Mildred D. Taylor  --  Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry
  • distinctly = clearly
  • As they got closer he occasionally could hear Mr. Sir's distinctive bark.
    Louis Sachar  --  Holes
  • distinctive = clear, easily noticed, and/or identifiable as different or separate — sometimes to indicate a difference that is excellent
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • When he faced Mr. Granger again his voice was very quiet, very distinct, very sure.
    Mildred D. Taylor  --  Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry
  • distinct = clearly heard
  • To this day, I can smell the smell of the bark—a sweet, woody smell—and feel the ridges in the bark, and taste that distinctive taste on my lips.
    Sharon Creech  --  Walk Two Moons
  • distinctive = easily identifiable
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • Next, I noticed that inside each figure was a distinct design. At first it seemed that every one was different. ... Then Mary Lou said, "Look at that—two are exactly the same."
    Sharon Creech  --  Walk Two Moons
  • distinct = easily seen as different (than others)
  • But before she could reach T.J., she was caught by the arm and flung so ferociously against the house that she fell, dazed, and Mr. Avery, struggling to reach her, was helpless to save either her or T.J. Christopher-John was sobbing distinctly now.
    Mildred D. Taylor  --  Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry
distinctly = in a manner that is clearly noticeable

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