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distinct

used in a sentence
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Definition clear, easily noticed, and/or identifiable as different or separate
  • Martinez and his colleagues identified 21 distinct emotions made by the human face.
distinct = different
  • Two distinct brain networks guide our judgments.
  • distinct = different
  • I distinctly remember my first kiss.
  • distinctly = clearly
  • In the early days, Facebook recognized two distinct genders. Now it has over 50.
  • distinct = clear and easily identified
  • She says it is a distinct possibility.
  • distinct = clear or identifiable
  • The differences in capabilities of a phone, tablet, and personal computer continue to grow less distinct.
  • distinct = clear or easily noticed
  • Which choice best summarizes the first paragraph of the passage:
    1. Population in the central city tends to grow and shrink at the same pace as population in the suburbs.
    2. Population growth in the central city and suburbs are two distinct phenomena.
  • distinct = different or separate
  • He heard the distinct shuffle of Peter's awkward footsteps behind him.
    Ben Mikaeslen  --  Touching Spirit Bear
  • distinct = easily identifiable
  • They were still too far away to see the camp, but he could hear a blend of indistinct voices.
    Louis Sachar  --  Holes
  • indistinct = not clear or easily identifiable
    (Editor's note:  The prefix "in-" in indistinct means not and reverses the meaning of distinct. This is the same pattern you see in words like invisible, incomplete, and insecure.)
  • 'I can smell him distinctly!' and at the word 'Snowball' all the dogs let out blood-curdling growls and showed their side teeth.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • distinctly = such that [his smell] is easily identifiable
  • She had an eyebrow ring, too, and I distinctly remember walking up to her as she was staring at a candle that was sitting on the windowsill in my grandmother's den and asking if she wanted any dessert.
    John Corey Whaley  --  Nogin
  • distinctly = in a manner that is easily identifiable
  • As they got closer he occasionally could hear Mr. Sir's distinctive bark.
    Louis Sachar  --  Holes
  • distinctive = clear, easily noticed, and/or identifiable as different or separate — sometimes to indicate a difference that is excellent
  • At about half past nine Napoleon, wearing an old bowler hat of Mr. Jones's, was distinctly seen to emerge from the back door, gallop rapidly round the yard, and disappear in doors again.
    George Orwell  --  Animal Farm
  • It was becoming quite distinct; he would be able to decipher the words soon, in a moment; even almost now, now, now.
    William Faulkner  --  Absalom, Absalom!
  • As I was walking away, I had the distinct feeling that Baba was watching me.
    Khaled Hosseini  --  And The Mountains Echoed
  • Each bell makes two distinct tones.
    Amy Tan  --  The Bonesetter's Daughter
  • But this was a distinctly minority view among Union soldiers by 1864.
    James M. McPherson  --  What They Fought For - 1861-1865
  • The clink of stones came to us sodden with the rain, indistinct, unmistakable.
    Kamala Markandaya  --  Nectar in a Sieve
  • (Editor's note:  The prefix "in-" in indistinct means not and reverses the meaning of distinct. This is the same pattern you see in words like invisible, incomplete, and insecure.)
  • "I can't see distinctly," said Ulrich; "nine or ten," "Then they are yours," said Georg; "I had only seven out with me."
    Saki  --  The Interlopers
  • I didn't see the name distinctly.
    Louisa May Alcott  --  Little Women

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