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reflect

used in a sentence
5 meanings
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1  —as in:
reflect in the mirror
Definition show an image back (on a mirror or other shiny surface)
  • She saw her face reflected in his sunglasses.
reflected = shown back
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • The pond reflected her image.
  • reflected = showed back
  • Why is the writing on my t-shirt backwards when its reflected in a mirror?
  • reflected = shown back
  • Slowly his eyes opened, and he looked at the sky reflecting in the water.
    Ben Mikaeslen  --  Touching Spirit Bear
  • reflecting = showing back an image (as on a mirror or shiny surface)
  • She didn't want to see herself reflected in his dark glasses.
    Kate DiCamillo  --  Flora & Ulysses
  • reflected = shown back
  • Harry could see himself reflected in those misty eyes.
    J.K. Rowling  --  Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone
  • reflected = shown back
  • "You see your world reflected in a mirror, but I have another mirror," Lale says.
    Heather Morris  --  The Tattooist of Auschwitz
  • reflected = shined back (a mirror image) (figuratively)
  • He throws no shadow, he make in the mirror no reflect, as again Jonathan observe.
    Bram Stoker  --  Dracula
  • reflect = image (shown back)
  • Usually I just see myself reflected, but once in a while I can see him.
    Neal Shusterman  --  Unwind
  • reflected = shown back (an image on a mirror)
  • The mirror was suddenly empty, reflecting only the room.
    Frank Beddor  --  The Looking Glass Wars
reflecting = showing back

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
2  —as in:
reflect American Values
Definition to show something — such as to demonstrate, express, or represent
The exact meaning of this sense of reflect depends upon its context. For example:
  • "She says the immorality in the movie reflects American values." — expresses or represents
  • "It reflects the selfishness she had seen growing for years." — demonstrates
  • "She did not reflect the panic that surrounded her." — demonstrate or show indication of
  • Which choice best reflects the overall sequence of events in the passage?
reflects = expresses
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • The author used gloomy weather to help reflect a depressing situation.
  • reflect = express
  • The restaurant's success reflects desire in the community to eat healthy food.
  • reflects = demonstrates
  • Her premature death reflects a broken health care system.
  • reflects = demonstrates or represents
  • We want the members of our police force to reflect the diversity of our community.
  • reflect = represent
  • Those skinny models don't reflect the customers who purchase our clothing.
  • reflect = represent
  • Harry looked at Ron and Hermione; their expressions reflected the mingled shock and gratitude he felt.
    J.K. Rowling  --  Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
  • reflected = expressed
  • As you know, it's customary to reflect the flavor of the district. For the opening ceremonies, you're supposed to wear something that suggests your district's principal industry.
    Suzanne Collins  --  The Hunger Games
  • reflect = represent, demonstrate, or express
  • His expression reflected both disbelief and humiliation.
    Carl Hiassen  --  Hoot
  • reflected = showed
  • Maybe the fear and nausea was no longer a sea to drown in, but only a pool of water reflecting the past alongside the now.
    Daniel Keyes  --  Flowers for Algernon — Novel
reflecting = showing

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
3  —as in:
I want to reflect on it.
Definition think carefully — possibly aloud or in writing
  • At the beginning of this passage, the author reflects on her life as a waitress.
reflects = thinks carefully
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • As I reflect on my life, I realize that it's relationships that matter most.
  • reflect = think carefully
  • I need more time to reflect.
  • reflect = think carefully
  • I've led a hectic life, but when I retire I want to slow down, reflect, and possibly write a book with some of my reflections.
  • reflect = think carefully
  • When you reflect on this past year, I want you all to look at where you are now and where you've been.
    R.J. Palacio  --  Wonder
  • reflect = think carefully
  • I paused some time to reflect on all he had related and the various arguments which he had employed.
    Mary Shelley  --  Frankenstein
  • reflect = think carefully
  • Walt, in a reflective mood, has had little to say, but he appears more at ease than he has in many days.
    Jon Krakauer  --  Into the Wild
  • reflective = thoughtful
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • Too often (I reflected, thinking of Sabrina) they display only thoughtless ingratitude.
    Margaret Atwood  --  The Blind Assassin
  • reflected = thought
  • John is a part of the family already, she reflected. We have all come to love him.
    Elizabeth George Speare  --  The Witch of Blackbird Pond
  • reflected = thought
  • Yet it is terrible to reflect that the lives of all these men are endangered through me.
    Mary Shelley  --  Frankenstein
reflect = think

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
4  —as in:
reflect poorly on the school
Definition influence opinion
  • The failing test scores would reflect poorly on the school.
reflect = influence opinion
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • The inaccurate report reflected poorly on the newspaper.
  • reflected = influenced opinion as specified
  • Winning the national championship would reflect positively on the whole school.
  • reflect = influence opinion
  • Funny, in the arena, when I poured out those berries, I was only thinking of outsmarting the Gamemakers, not how my actions would reflect on the Capitol.
    Suzanne Collins  --  The Hunger Games
  • reflect = influence opinion about
  • She put me on the list of organizers, not only to keep me hopping but because it would reflect well on Richard.
    Margaret Atwood  --  The Blind Assassin
  • reflect = influence opinion
  • But each such error reflected negatively on his parents' guidance and infringed on the community's sense of order and success.
    Lois Lowry  --  The Giver
  • reflected = influenced opinion
  • Every son reflects upon his mother.
    Madeline Miller  --  Circe
  • reflects = influences opinion
  • Oh, it's sad, very sad that the old adage has been confirmed for the umpteenth time: "What one Christian does is his own responsibility, what one Jew does reflects on all Jews."
    Anne Frank  --  The Diary of a Young Girl
  • reflects = influences opinion
  • They won't call attention to my rudeness because it would reflect on their parenting.
    Lois Lowry  --  The Giver
  • reflect = influence opinion
  • A fifteen-year-old running away from home like that — it would reflect badly on the family.
    Margaret Atwood  --  The Blind Assassin
reflect = influence opinion

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
5  —as in:
reflect the light/heat/sound
Definition bounce back (rather than absorbing)
  • We're replacing all the warning signs with signs that reflect headlights in the dark.
reflect = bounce back light from
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • The stop signs in this neighborhood reflect light, so you won't miss them even if there isn't a nearby street light.
  • reflect = bounce back
  • Reflective highway signs save lives.
  • reflective = having the characteristic of bouncing back light
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • I wear a reflective jacket when I bicycle at night.
  • reflective = having the characteristic of bouncing back light
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • We get an echo when the sound reflects off of the canyon walls.
  • reflects = bounces back
  • The glowing embers cast faint shadows into the surrounding night, and under the trees, a large set of eyes reflected the light, staring patiently out of the darkness.
    Ben Mikaeslen  --  Touching Spirit Bear
  • reflected = shined back
  • Eventually, I give in and slide into the sleeping bag with Peeta. It's toasty warm and I snuggle down gratefully until I realize it's more than warm, it's overly hot because the bag is reflecting back his fever.
    Suzanne Collins  --  The Hunger Games
  • reflecting = bouncing back (rather than the heat leaving the bag, it stays within it)
  • At the end of this path I could see something shiny and metallic reflecting the moonlight.
    Sharon Creech  --  Walk Two Moons
  • reflecting = shining (bouncing back)
  • The sun, reflecting off the shiny bus, glinted in Esperanza's eyes.
    Pam Munoz Ryan  --  Esperanza Rising
  • reflecting = shining back
  • There was a street light behind me somewhere through the trees and the windows of the Infirmary dimly reflected it.
    John Knowles  --  A Separate Peace
reflected = shined back (the light from)

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
Less commonly:
See a comprehensive dictionary for less common meanings of reflect.
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