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revise

used in a sentence
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Definition to change (and hopefully improve) — most frequently to improve a written document, but it can be any intentional change such as a change in an estimated amount, a plan, or a series of procedures

In the UK, revise can also mean to review material previously studied to prepare for a test.
  • How can you revise that paragraph to improve the expression of ideas?
revise = improve (change)
  • Do you think the writer should revise the underlined sentence?
  • revise = improve (change)
  • The bus broke down, so I need to revise my estimated time of arrival.
  • revise = change
  • I have a rough plan, but I want to talk with others on the team and revise it.
  • revise = improve or change
  • How can we revise order fulfillment to be more efficient?
  • revise = improve
  • They revised their estimates of last year's growth.
  • revised = changed
  • This is the second revision of my term paper, but I want to get a good night's sleep and look at it one more time.
  • revision = changed version
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  • Do you like my revisions?
  • revisions = changes
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sions", converts a verb into a plural noun that denotes results of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in discussions from discuss, explosions from explode, and revisions from revise.)
  • [of her algebra book]  It's old, yellowed, full of scribbles, crossed-out words and revisions.
    Anne Frank  --  The Diary of a Young Girl
  • revisions = changes
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sions", converts a verb into a plural noun that denotes results of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in discussions from discuss, explosions from explode, and revisions from revise.)
  • Crake was his best friend. Revision: his only friend.
    Margaret Atwood  --  Oryx and Crake
  • revision = changed version
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  • The last thing I remember is that I was thinking about the revision I needed to do for the next day.
    Malala Yousafzai  --  I Am Malala
  • revision = a change; or a changed version
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  • "No," I said, and then revised. "Well, maybe I wouldn't go so far as no."
    John Green  --  The Fault in Our Stars
  • revised = changed what was said
  • Now I needed to understand how the great gatekeepers of history had come to terms with their own ignorance and partiality: I thought if I could accept that what they had written was not absolute but was the result of a biased process of conversation and revision, maybe I could reconcile myself with the fact that the history most people agreed upon was not the history I had been taught.
    Tara Westover  --  Educated
  • revision = making changes
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  • "The earlier revision has been revoked. Closer examination of the rule book has disclosed that only one winner may be allowed," he says.
    Suzanne Collins  --  The Hunger Games
  • revision = change
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  • She decided to revise the recipe slightly, just so she could use the flowers.
    Laura Esquivel  --  Like Water for Chocolate
  • revise = change
  • After that little maneuver, the rules are being revised to require that all of the enemy's soldiers must be frozen or disabled before the gate can be reversed.
    Orson Scott Card  --  Ender's Game
  • revised = changed
  • "Recall is made more difficult because memories can be changed." Beetee taps his forehead. "Brought to the forefront of your mind, altered, and saved again in the revised form."
    Suzanne Collins  --  Mockingjay
  • revised = changed
  • I retrieved my journal and wrote another entry, opposite the first, in which I revised the memory.
    Tara Westover  --  Educated
  • revised = changed what was said
  • Why can't Snowman revise the mythology?
    Margaret Atwood  --  Oryx and Crake
  • revise = change
  • I revise my suicide plan to slow death by morphling.
    Suzanne Collins  --  Mockingjay

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